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10 Fab Cold Weather Ice Creams

It’s no secret that I love ice cream (at least in my house), and I eat way more of it during the winter months than when it’s blazing hot outside.

I’m not sure why this is. It could be that my body craves more fat and calories and nougat in January than in July. It could also be that it gets dark at 5 o’clock — what else is there to do than whip up another batch of Rocky Road?  Plus the glut of very impressive artisan ice cream cookbooks published in recent years have made it hard not to churn up batch after batch of stuff like The Darkest Chocolate Ice Cream in the World.

But I suspect the real reason I prefer ice cream in January is because winter weather demands a rich, decadent, heady ice cream eating experience that a simple bowl of vanilla and strawberries could never satisfy–it would leave me cold, if you can pardon the hackneyed pun.

Winter ice creams are all about layered flavors, a chewy texture, spices, nuts, dried fruit and booze. Flavors can be outlandish, though I personally draw the line at recipes blatantly intended to shock  – Maple Ice Cream Flecked with Black Olives is just desperate.

Here are 10 fab cold weather ice cream recipes to consider making by March.

 

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  • Pear Pecorino 1 of 10
    Pear Pecorino
    Ordinarily, I'm not a huge fun of the cheese-N-ice-cream shtick, but I make an exception for Pear Pecorino created by dessert guru David Lebovitz. Tiny slivers of salty pecorino play off the sweetness of the pears. The key is to dice the cheese into rice size bites. It's perfection. Recipe via Rurally Screwedadapted from David Lebovitz's wonderful cookbook "The Perfect Scoop".
  • Roxbury Road 2 of 10
    Roxbury Road
    Rick milky chocolate, smoked almonds, handmade marshmallows and gooey caramel sauce—Roxbury Road is essential eating for dark, dreary Sunday evenings in January. Recipe via Los Gatos Foodie picked up Jeni Britton Bauer's "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home."
  • Brown Sugar Ice Cream with a Ginger-Caramel Swirl 3 of 10
    Brown Sugar Ice Cream with a Ginger-Caramel Swirl
    Recipe via Epicurious from the cookbook "Sweet Cream and Sugar Cones." Photo credit: Paige Green
  • Mulled Wine 4 of 10
    Mulled Wine
    I know, I know--"mulled wine ice cream?" But trust me, this sophisticated treat is knock down delicious. See my blog for the recipe.
  • Fig Ice Cream 5 of 10
    Fig Ice Cream
    I haven't made this one yet but it sounds amazing and it's from Saveur so you know it's going to be good. Photo credit: Helen Rosner
  • The Darkest Chocolate Ice Cream in the World 6 of 10
    The Darkest Chocolate Ice Cream in the World
    It's a pretty bold statement but it's true -- this really may be THE darkest ice cream in the world. The recipe is from Jeni Britton Bauer's "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home", and her genius, apart from using primo dark chocolate and unsweetened cocoa powder, is the addition of a bit of corn starch in every recipe. The corn starch thickens the ice cream and absorbs any excess water so you don't have to worry about soupy chocolate. Recipe via Saveur. Photo credit: Todd Coleman
  • Gingersnap with Caramel Oranges 7 of 10
    Gingersnap with Caramel Oranges
    Fans of gingersnap cookies will love this cold weather treat. Recipe via Rurally Screwed.
  • Olive Oil Gelato 8 of 10
    Olive Oil Gelato
    For maximum flavor, use the highest quality olive oil you can find! Recipe and photo via Food52 from the cookbook "Ice Creams, Sorbets & Gelatis" by Robin and Caroline Weir. Photo credit: Food52
  • Bangkok Peanut 9 of 10
    Bangkok Peanut
    A combination of toasted coconut, peanut butter, coconut milk and a smidge of cayenne. I've made two batches of this already. A little bit of softened cream cheese is added for extra body. Recipe via my blog from the cookbook "Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home."
  • Bourbon Ice Cream 10 of 10
    Bourbon Ice Cream

 

 

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