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7 Fun Facts About Disney’s New Short “Get A Horse”

Frozen hit screens nationwide last week to a wow-ing opening weekend of $93 million! If you were one of the lucky ones that got to see it (where I live, practically every showing was sold out), then you may have been scratching your head over the latest Disney short that is shown just before Frozen. The short is called “Get A Horse” and it is a magical blend of 1928 meets 2013 with 2D and 3D animation. Wondering if that was really Walt’s voice or if it was a real short from 1928? Click through the slideshow below for 7 fun facts about Disney’s new short “Get A Horse.”

  • Walt Disney’s "Get A Horse," Starring… Mickey Mouse 1 of 7
    Get-A-Horse-06

    It's commonly known that Walt Disney was the original voice of Mickey Mouse. Since this short features the Mickey Mouse of 1928, it also stars Walt Disney as the voice of Mickey! For over 3 months, the sound team listened to recordings from 1928-1946 and pieced together the entire script... with one tiny exception. There was NO recording of the word "red" anywhere! So the associate editor pulled the sounds r-e-d and combined them to make the word "red."

  • So is this a real "lost" film? 2 of 7
    2013-11-20-09.39.51

    Sorry to burst your bubble, but no, "Get a Horse" is a brand new film and took about 18 months to create. To make the 2D seem more authentic, "We added… dust, scratches, blobs, gloom around the blacks to make it look like [an] over-exposed, high-contrast film," said animator Eric Goldberg.

  • A Retro Film With A Modern Director 3 of 7
    Get-A-Horse-05

    Although the short has a retro look and feel, "Get A Horse" is a trendsetter. "Get A Horse" is the first animated film to be directed in full by a woman (Lauren MacMullan). 

  • Going Back to Mickey’s Roots 4 of 7
    Get-A-Horse-01

    Mickey Mouse is a character than is known all across the world. However, the Mickey that we have known for the past 20 yrs or so, doesn't look like the Mickey of the past. The Mickey of now was designed by Freddy Moore, who, as Eric Goldberg says, "was one of the greatest Disney animators ever."

    To go back to retro Mickey, the animators had to unlearn everything they knew. "Walt's earliest Mickey starts with a more rounded circle, a slightly more pronounced snout," stated Goldberg as we watched him sketch retro Mickey before our eyes. He explained Mickey's old body shape (a barbell) and how he was more hard angles than the soft curves we know now.

  • 2D? What? 5 of 7
    Get-A-Horse-02

    In the olden days, animators worked with special contraptions called paper and pencils. That's exactly how the 2D animation was created for this fun short... by hand. You may think this was easy, but it was one of the most difficult tasks for the animators to do.

  • When worlds collide 6 of 7
    Get-A-Horse-03

    As director MacMullan explained, they basically had to create the whole short in 2D animation and go back and re-do it with 3D and then combine the two to make it see authentic and real. It's a awesome mix of retro meets present.

    Side note: Look for Oswald make a split second cameo on the 3D side! Blink and you may miss him!

  • A Classic Home Run 7 of 7
    Get-A-Horse-04

    "Get A Horse" breaks new frontier with it's old world meets new theme however, it still holds the same quality and magic that is synonymous with the name "Walt Disney." 

    "Get A Horse" is now showing before Frozen in theaters everywhere.

 

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