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Amplifying the Voices of Girls Who Have None

Looking at my daughters always makes me think long and hard about how privileged they are to live in a society where they have a real fighting chance in this world. That’s certainly not to say we don’t have our own gender-based societal challenges here in the United States, but they are living a life far beyond the dreams of many girls who are living and growing up in the developing world. As a mother of daughters I am reminded of that fact every single day and work to amplify my digital voice for girls who live in poverty and compromised situations.

Statistics prove that it is systemically difficult for young girls living in poverty in developing countries to overcome the stigmas of society without a helping hand. Having visited and seen abject poverty in Kenya, the Caribbean, and Brazil, I know that girls don’t want a hand out; they just need a hand up.

One organization that is working to specifically help girls in the slums of Liberia, West Africa, is More Than Me. More Than Me identifies vulnerable girls in the slums in Monrovia, Liberia’s capital, and gets them into school. I have been following More Than Me’s work throughout the year and am impressed by the impact they are forging with young girls who are being given a future through education.

More Than Me is in the running to win an American Giving Award by Chase where they can be one of five organizations sharing $2 million in grants. Money goes a long way in Africa. A fraction of the $2 million will make an enormous, enormous difference for 1000 girls in Liberia.

You can visit Facebook here to vote for More Than Me. They want you to vote for Abigail (right) who was an orphan and 10 years old when she was first forced to sell herself. She didn’t have enough money to buy a glass of water. Now because of More Than Me, Abigail is off the street, in school, and thriving. She, along with thousands of Abigails in Liberia, needs a voice and your vote.

Learn more about More Than Me at www.morethanme.org.

 

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