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Can You Live on $1.50 a Day?

If you travel to some of the most income poor countries on the planet you quickly realize that people live and eat on a lot less than we do. It’s a hard truth to grapple with, to be sure, but  a sad reality of global poverty. The good news is the number of people who are living on less than $1.50 a day, the international amount the World Bank has designated as living on the edge of subsistence, has fallen significantly since 1990. And yet, 1.4 billion people still live in severe poverty globally.

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Basketweaver in rural Ethiopia. Photo: Jennifer James

That’s where the collective “we” comes in.

Each year for five short days people band together and live on $1.50 a day to raise funds and awareness about global poverty. The Live Below the Line campaign challenges people to eat and drink on $1.50 a day to understand the plight of those who live on that meager amount each day as a matter of circumstance and not as a matter of choice.

image001Held this year between April 29 – March 3 the Global Poverty Project’s Live Below the Line campaign will provide raised funds to ten leading organizations: Opportunity International, World Food Program USA, Happy Hearts Fund, U.S. Fund for UNICEF, The ISIS Foundation, GVN Foundation, CARE, The Somaly Mam Foundation, Rainforest Foundation and Milaap.

 

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Rural woman – Ethiopia. Photo: Jennifer James

If you would like to participate in the Live Below the Line campaign you can already register at livebelowtheline.com and can follow the conversation at #belowtheline.

Read more of Jennifer’s writing about global development and social good at Mom Bloggers for Social Good.

 

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