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DIY: How to Make a Snowman When You Have No Snow

Oh, the weather outside is … 80 degrees! It’s so very warm right now in Los Angeles and even when the weather cools down again (to 70 degrees!) we won’t be seeing snow here. But that doesn’t mean we don’t have the holiday spirit.

I recently went to an event hosted by fellow Babble Voices blogger Yolanda Machado where I was given household items to decorate a snowman with. These included wash mitts for the hands, two dowels for arms, wall bumpers for eyes and a table leg for the nose. This was all great, but we had nothing to stick the arms into. I went to my husband and boys and said, “We should carve a snowman out of wood!” (We all knew that what I really meant was that they should carve it out of wood while I take pictures, sitting in a lawn chair drinking iced tea.) It was a delightful day and the cutest craft ever.

They started with a piece of plywood and a couple of hours later they had an incredible snowman. You need power tools for this craft, but the effort is worth it. We will have this snowman for years to come (unless someone steals it off of our lawn. This is LA). Here are the steps we (okay, they) took to make our DIY wood snowman …

  • How to Create a Snowman When You Have No Snow 1 of 12
    Snowman-Closeup

    This is what our dapper snowman looked like at the end of day. All it took was plywood, power tools, paint and some household items.

     

    Photo by Yvonne Condes 

  • Step 1: Start with Plywood 2 of 12
    Wood2

    We started with a 24" x 48" piece of plywood that we bought at the hardware store for about $20.

     

    Photo by Yvonne Condes 

  • Step 2: Bring Out the Power Tools 3 of 12
    Circular-saw

    My husband didn't use any plans, but he and my boys figured out how big the biggest circle could be for the 24" x 48" piece of wood, which was 24 inches. Then they scaled down the other two circles, or snowballs, by a 1/3 each (to ~16" and ~10.5"), and overlapped them to make the right shape.   

     

    They drew the circles by putting a nail through a small stick of wood, then drilling holes for the radius of each circle and using a pencil through the hole to circle around a draw each circle.

     

    Photo by Yvonne Condes 

  • Step 3: Sand Down the Edges 4 of 12
    boys-with-snowman1

    Once the snowman was cut, then it was time to sand down the edges.

     

    Photo by Yvonne Condes 

  • Step 3 (continued): Sand the Snowman 5 of 12
    Sanding-Edges

    They sanded the edges with an electric sander to make them rounded. 

     

    Photo by Yvonne Condes 

  • Have Your Materials at the Ready! 6 of 12
    Supplies

    We were given items that you can find around your house or at the hardware store for the snowman at an event hosted by fellow Babble Blogger Yolanda Machado. They included ducting for the hat, wall bumpers for the eyes, a table leg for the nose, birch wheels for the eyes, furniture leg tips for the buttons, and wash mitts for the hands. You could also use oven mitts for gloves for the hands, sticks from the yard for the arms, and real buttons for the eyes and buttons. (The light saber was not used for the craft, but during break time.)

     

    Photo by Yvonne Condes 

  • Step 4: Paint the Wall Bumpers and Ducting 7 of 12
    Painting

    My older son painted the ducting and the wall bumpers black for the top hat and the buttons.

     

    Photo by Yvonne Condes 

  • Step 5: Paint the Birch Wheels 8 of 12
    Coloring-the-eyes

    My younger son painted birch wheels red for the mouth. 

     

    Photo by Yvonne Condes 

  • Step 6: Paint the "Nose" 9 of 12
    Nose

    They also painted a table leg orange for the nose. 

     

    Photo by Yvonne Condes 

  • Step 7: Paint the Snowman’s Body 10 of 12
    Painted-snowman

    While my boys were painting the nose, mouth, eyes, and buttons, my husband was priming and painting the snowman. Once the paint was dry, they attached the nose, mouth, and buttons using roofing nails. They attached the arms with flagpole holders and drilled holes in the head to attach the hat.

     

    Photo by Yvonne Condes 

  • Step 8: Stand Your Snowman Up 11 of 12
    Snowman-Stand

    To hold the snowman up, they attached him to a fencepost support stake that they had driven into the lawn.

     

    Photo by Yvonne Condes 

  • Step 9: Admire Your Snowman! 12 of 12
    Completed-snowman

    After all of that work, our Snowman is ready! 

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