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Have Ads That Target Young Girls Gone Too Far?

Have Ads For Young Girls Gone Too Far

This week, Victoria’s Secret launched their new line of lingerie called “Bright Young Things”, and while they say that the line is targeted toward the college age crowd, when your CFO and Executive Vice President says, “When somebody’s 15 or 16 years old, what do they want to be? They want to be older, and they want to be cool like the girl in college, and that’s part of the magic of what we do at PINK,” I kinda have to wonder who’s telling the truth.

brightyoungthings

Now, I’m not prude, but really- “Feeling Lucky” “Call Me” “Wild”? They are things that even I would blush to have splashed on my bottom. However, sadly this marketing is less unusual than it should be and coming dangerously close to being considered the norm. Last month, Sketchers unveiled their new line of Tween targeted shoes, called… wait for it…. wait.. Daddy’$ Money. No, I’m not kidding.

Daddy$Money

Parents everywhere where outraged and posts popped up everywhere about the sneakers with the hidden 2 inch wedge heel (a two inch heel for a developing body- SMART right? Ugh).  Some say it’s a sign of the times, little girls growing up too quickly. But when you think about it, this way of thinking has been around for years. Just check out some examples in the slideshow below…some will make you seriously wonder about the world.

I’m the mother of a 5 yr old little girl, and I am trying as hard as possible to have her grow up to be a confident, smart, well rounded female who can be anything she wants to be.  Every time I see marketing that not only undermines my intelligence as a parent (right- Daddy’$ Money means nothing…HA), but instills the belief that my daughter will only be valued for her body or how “cool” she is, it makes me scared for the future. Scared because of the fact that not only is this frame of mind still out there, but because despite the strides women have made in the decades prior, not only is the marketing of these items highly pushed, but there are people being paid really well to create such garbage.

Do you think marketing towards young girls has gone too far? 

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  • Ads Gone Too Far 1 of 9
    Ads Gone Too Far
  • Teen Talk Barbie 2 of 9
    Teen Talk Barbie
    Mattel released this Barbie in July of 1992 who said phrases like "Will we ever have enough clothes?", "I love shopping!", and "Wanna have a pizza party?" and the memorable, "Math class is tough."
  • Oh! Lola 3 of 9
    Oh! Lola
    Marc Jacobs Ad featuring Dakota Fanning was banned for sexualizing children. At the time. Dakota was 17.
  • JC Penney Tshirt 4 of 9
    JC Penney Tshirt
    What it says, says it all. It was pulled within days.
  • Diet Book for Girls 4-8 yrs old 5 of 9
    Diet Book for Girls 4-8 yrs old
    Maggie Goes on a Diet- about a girl who ""is transformed from being extremely overweight and insecure to a normal sized girl who becomes the school soccer star." The book was targeting 4-8 yr old girls. Gotta break that self esteem young!
  • Lego Friends 6 of 9
    Lego Friends
    Lego releases a more "girly" version to target young girls. Having been gender neutral for decades, parents and activists fumed.
  • Harrod’s London 7 of 9
    Harrod's London
    This photo was made famous on Twitter when a customer snapped a pic and tweeted about her outrage. Girls can be gorgeous, and boys can be clever...got it.
  • Obesity Campaign Atlanta 8 of 9
    Obesity Campaign Atlanta
    While this one was not targeted primarily towards girls, the Atlanta Strong 4 Life Campaign had billboards such as this one all over Atlanta shaming children and their parents to end obesity. Ads were pulled after parents fought back online.
  • 15 yr old Brooke Shields Calvin Klein 9 of 9
    15 yr old Brooke Shields Calvin Klein
    Probably the ad that started it all, 15 yr old Brooke Shields in her "nothing gets between me and my Calvins" ad. Wearing only one button and assuming she was commando, the ad caused a stir everywhere and is still talked about 30+ years later.

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