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Homemade Werther’s Pralines: Fall’s Perfect Candy

We can all agree that Werther’s Original candies are The Joint, in and of themselves, straight out of their crinkly golden wrappers. So when one is charged with taking Werther’s to The Next Level, it can be, well, just a wee bit daunting.

How do you take what’s awesome and make it EVEN AWESOMER? Well, by adding nuts, of course!

Here’s how to pull it off:

Homemade Werther’s Pralines:

1 bag – Werther’s Original Candies (You’ll be using about 2/3rds of the bag)
1/4 c – Water
1/2 c – Heavy Cream (warmed)
1 bag – Pecan Halves

Directions:

In a heavy bottomed sauce pan, add the unwrapped Werthers and water. Stirring constantly over medium heat, dissolve the candies.

Once dissolved, crank up the heat and let the mixture boil to what’s known among candy-making folk as the “soft ball” stage (this is around 325 degrees F). If you don’t have a candy thermometer you can test for this stage by dropping a bit of the boiling syrup into a glass of cold water. If it’s at the right temperature, the dollop will form a — you guessed it — soft ball. Clever, no?

Once the syrup reaches the soft ball stage, add the warmed cream (whisking constantly), and be mindful of the bubbling (you haven’t truly experienced pain until you’ve had a deep, boiling candy syrup burn, so be careful!).

Next, butter a sheet of parchment paper. Place three or four pecan pieces on the buttered parchment and spoon the Werther’s caramel over the top.

And that’s it — you just made some Baller Status pecan pralines! You may want to refrigerate the these to firm them up a bit (or you may want to just grab a spoon and Do Work. Either way, you’re in the right).

Enjoy with a nice cup of coffee or hot tea for optimal results.

What are your favorite Fall treats to make and eat?

A big thanks to Werther’s for sponsoring this campaign. Click here to see more of the discussion.

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