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Kevin Pearce: Brain Injury Hero

Henry Granju

Henry, before the brain injury

In the first two weeks after Henry entered the hospital, we were told that he’d suffered both major types of brain injury – traumatic and hypoxic. But that after he woke from the coma, he’d made it past the critical point. We all thought he was going to live. The online photo album I started at that time with photos from Henry’s hospital stay is still to this day titled, “Henry’s Recovery,” and I spent every moment I could in those first two weeks researching care and rehabilitation for brain injury patients, anticipating a long road back for Henry.

I just knew he could do it, and we would help him.

But of course, that’s not what happened. Henry began to deteriorate after he was moved to the neurological rehab unit from intensive care, mystifying the doctors who were by then treating him as a brain rehab patient, not a critically injured patient. It took a very smart neurologist named Dr. Steven Rider to finally figure out what was going on. Henry had developed an uncommon complication of hypoxic brain injury called Delayed Post Hypoxic Leukoencepalopathy. Shortly before Henry died, we were told that his DPHL progression was the worst anyone at UT Medical Center had ever seen.

But since my teenager’s death due to brain injury, I now notice other adolescent and young adult brain injury patients in a way I never did before. And I cheer when I see someone with a major brain injury come back from near death through great rehabilitation and care and support and encouragement.

That’s why this new Bing commercial with snowboarder Kevin Pearce makes me happy.

Happy and sad, both, actually. But mostly so very happy for Kevin and his family. It’s beautiful.

 

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READ MORE FROM KATIE OVER AT MAMAPUNDIT (HER PERSONAL BLOG)

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