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Maternity Fashion Through the Ages

For many years maternity fashion was not really a ‘thing.’ In fact, women would even just wear an apron over their clothes to hide their growing tummies. As years passed, fashion designers started experimenting and making dresses that could work for every stage of the pregnancy. Simple changes like adding a drawstring and extra fabric may seem obvious, but they were pretty revolutionary for their time.

Get a peek on how things have changed by checking out Maternity Fashion Through the Ages…

  • Maternity Fashion Through the Ages 1 of 6
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    Click through to see them all...

  • 1500s Elizabethan England 2 of 6
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    Imagine putting on layers and layers of clothes with that baby bump. Not exactly your cup of tea.
    Find out more at Huffington Post.

  • 60s Maternity Wear 3 of 6
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    In the 1960s it was cute and comfortable with a smock top. Love the Peter Pan collar.
    Find out more at The Guardian Photo credit: Lambert /Getty Images.

  • 1700s Maternity Dress 4 of 6
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    Here is a peek at what you might wear as a pregnant woman in the 1700 hundreds.
    Find out more at Digital Museum.

  • Pre-Civil War Maternity Dress 5 of 6
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    A drawstring waist was a crucial part in making this a dress that could be adjusted to fit the baby bump.
    Find out more at Sarah Elizabeth Gallery.

  • Colonial Williamsburg Maternity Dress 6 of 6
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    A flowing dress such as this was made to be able to grow with the woman's changing body.
    Find out more at Huffington Post.

Jacinda Boneau is a fabric designer and founding co-editor at Pretty Prudent, the premier design and lifestyle blog providing inspiration and instruction to help anyone create beautiful things, food, and experiences for their friends and family.

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