Previous Post Next Post

Babble Voices

With

Mr Lady

Connect with Mr

Shannon Carroll was the blogger behind Whiskey In My Sippy Cup, a critically acclaimed blog about nothing in particular. She currently writes on her new blog, Shannonigans, and is the Conference Programming Manager at BlogHer.com. She is the mother of a teenaged son, a tween boy and an elementary-aged daughter. She was previously a Babble Voices contributor.

Brought to you by

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Dinnertime

By Mr Lady |

If you Google search “get your kids to eat veggies,” you will get something over 18 million results. Apparently, this is an issue for people.

Personally, I’ve never once had to bribe/beg/force my kids to eat vegetables. I try to save my forcing/begging/bribing for back-walking. They’re only little once, people. Either way, I figured that I’d try to help at least ten of those 18 million people who don’t know how to get their kid to eat a mushroom. (Answer: put a pizza under it).

nggallery template=’carousel’ id=’8′

/
How I Got My Kids To Eat Their Veggies

I make veggies the treat, not the enemy

Sometimes that means mixing a veggie with something else they like more (not hiding, mind you, mixing) like tomatoes with blueberries, or broccoli with cheese. This says that I equate these two things as equal, and they should, too. Note: Tomato and blueberry salad with some balsamic vinaigrette? TO DIE FOR. Will make you the hit of the block party.
And what kid will say no to one of these 10 ways to serve vegetables?


Read more from me on my personal blog,

Follow me, like me, circle me.

Don’t miss the latest from Babble Voices – Like Us on Facebook!
More of me on Cucumbersome:
☆ The Blueberries Make It Special
☆ My 11 Best Meals of 2011, and Bugs.

 

More on Babble

About Mr Lady

mrlady

Mr Lady

Shannon Carroll was the blogger behind Whiskey In My Sippy Cup, a critically acclaimed blog about nothing in particular. She currently writes on her new blog, Shannonigans, and is the Conference Programming Manager at BlogHer.com. She is the mother of a teenaged son, a tween boy and an elementary-aged daughter. She was previously a Babble Voices contributor. Read bio and latest posts → Read Mr Lady's latest posts →

« Go back to Babble Voices

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Comments, together with personal information accompanying them, may be used on Babble.com and other Babble media platforms. Learn More.

8 thoughts on “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Dinnertime

  1. MommyTime says:

    I do all these things too, so I’m here to provide a cheering section to say that in combination, this totally works. I do think the combination is key, though. If you mostly try to hide the veggies and let the kids get out of trying them, then one day try the tomato-and-blueberry-salad approach, they will call foul. You just have to treat veggies like every other food.

    One other suggestion I have is to allow for one or two “get out of jail free” cards. My son cannot eat cooked carrots without gagging. Like, literally, getting sick into his plate. He gets a pass on those, and any dish that contains them, he knows I will offer him raw ones in substitute. Mushrooms, he hates but his sister loves. Spinach is the reverse. I often will put both of those veggies in a dish (like an omelette), and let them do a trade-off. They have to have at least one bite of each veg, and then can trade the rest of the mushroom for the spinach. No fighting. We all win.

  2. BusyDad says:

    Our vegetable philosophy is one and the same! I have a one-bite rule as well. I let them eat bad stuff as long as they also eat the good stuff. I don’t make them eat anything I hate. We are either both rare finds, or just the same as everyone else. I will assume it’s the former and feel awesome about it.

  3. MommyTime says:

    Wait wait wait, Busydad! I know you didn’t just leave me out of that club?! At the very least, we are three of a kind. It’s like some kind of awesome secret society.

  4. Korinthia Klein says:

    This is a great list! And I didn’t know that about taste buds.
    /
    The only one I might disagree with a little is limiting things to stuff you like. The taste bud philosophy should apply to us as well! My kids and I regularly find stuff in the grocery store that’s new for me, too, and often I don’t like it but one of my kids will. (And sauteed brussells sprouts are delicious!)
    /
    http://the-quiet-corner.blogspot.com/

  5. Kristin Hackman says:

    The most important point made – to stop worrying about it. I caught myself one day actually chasing my newly one year old toddler around, trying to get her to drink her new night cap, cows milk, out of her new vessel – a sippy cup. I considered myself crazy and thought, you know, sometimes I’m in the mood for a glass of wine and not water at night, and no one is chasing me around, trying to get me to drink my water…I’m done worrying about it.

    Great advice – thanks for the perspective & tips. (I second Korinthia – as scary as it sounds, brussels sprouts with garlic and olive oil and sauteed are awesome!)

    http://www.justbreathemama.com

  6. Fawn says:

    I have a recipe for brussels sprouts smothered in bacon, parmesan, and sour cream. That’s just as good as putting a pizza under a mushroom. (Now, if ya’ll can get Mr. Lady to eat asparagus, you’ll earn your superhero tights, I believe.)

    I’m lucky that my 3 year old loves food of all kinds. She eats her veggies and meat like a champ. She’s not as interested in potatoes, but she can skip those as far as I’m concerned. She’s getting the *really* good stuff.

    I love your idea about the food “toolkit”! And tastebuds. Dude, really?

  7. Janet says:

    My 3 yo does not like veggies. I try to put them on her plate but they usually get handed right back. If I ask her to taste them, she takes the smallest bite possible. I’ve tried the mushrooms on pizza, but because mushrooms get darker when they cook, she can see them and refuses to eat the pizza until the mushrooms are gone. I have put spinach in meatballs, but that didn’t work either – the green stuff must be removed. I try and will keep trying. Eventually she will eat veggies, but I’ve learned that I can’t worry about it. It will just make me crazy (well, crazier). These are all great ideas that I will certainly be trying to incorporate too.

  8. Cari says:

    My DS(2) is brilliant with fruit, not great with veg. We always offer it and eat the same as he does. Sometimes he will eat it and other times not. If he doesn’t like something that has veg in it we say that’s fine you don’t have to eat it but that’s all there is. And he always asks for his plate back a few minutes later. Persistence pays, I think.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *.

Previous Post Next Post

The Daily Babble