Previous Post Next Post

Babble Voices

With

Jessica Ashley

Connect with Jessica

Jessica Ashley wears inappropriately high heels to the playground and is author of the single-mom-in-the-city blog, Sassafrass. Jessica's work appears on Huffington Post Live, GalTime, TakePart, AOL and Yahoo! Shine, where she was a founding senior editor. She’s the mother of one boy, and the proof is in the pile of Star Wars Lego guys at the bottom of her purse.

Brought to you by

Best Parts of Having a Big Kid

By Jessica Ashley |

photo credit: Jessica Ashley

I know six people due the first week of December. As I ordered too many pairs of ruffle-bottom bloomers and tuxedo onesies for those new babes making their way into the world, my ovaries eased up into my brain and turned my laser-sharp online shopping focus to those oxytocin-filled moments of kissing chubbers baby cheeks and a sweaty newborn head pressed against the chest and the giggles over any little thing. Oh, for the love of all things fertile, THE GIGGLES.

I can’t wait to hold those babies and to celebrate the place they make in some very loving families. And I haven’t yet given up on the idea, the faint and fabulous and deliriously amnesic idea, of having another baby myself. But as soon as my ovaries wore out and returned to their rightful place, I remembered how great I have it as a mother of an eight-year old.

I’m not one of those moms who loved any particular phase or rued a certain stage. Even in the challenges, in the PullUps and stiff-as-a-board/dead-body-limp tantrums in Target aisles and years of operating in sleep deficit, I was in love with some part of that time in my son’s life.

Sometimes I miss the olden days of singing a screaming infant to sleep for three hours or mastitis-throbbing boobs or lispy preschool incessant questioning. Of course. Those were very good times. But in my insistence on being present for each stage, I’ve also found some really good replacements for those moments and baby-ways I occasionally long for.

Stage 8 is not perfect. There are “OhmahgawMOMMMMM”s and door slamming and times I repeat a request to place dirty chonies in the laundry basket 67 times. There are bigger kid problems of bullying and boredom and bad breath and emerging toe hair. There are glimpses of tweendom and teendom and declaring a double major in French and Woven Arts at a $58,000 a year college. No matter. I am good. We are good. And this kid? He’s both parts crazy-amazing.

Here are a few reasons why big kids rule (for now).

 

 

nggallery template=’carousel’ id=’13′

/
The Parts of Having a Big Kid

The silly drawings with fake cursive scribbles he leaves around the house

Of course, it was a delight to see those first jumbo-crayon scribbles and to try to decipher whether the picture was of an elephant in a hat or grandpa with a Diet Coke. Hilarious times! But it's just as much fun (maybe more) to see what this big kid comes up with. Even if it's clearly an angry mommy on the potty wearing high heels. (Not scrapbookable, kid. So not scrapbookable.)

 

Read more of Jessica’s adventures as a single mom in the city at Sassafrass.

Meet up on Twitter. 

Ogle shoes together on Pinterest.

 

Read more of Sassafrass Says So Here:

How Single Parents Split Up a Kid’s Christmas List

Are You Still Holding on to Your Big Kid’s Baby Stuff?

13 Lessons Moms Hope Kids Learned from the Election

More on Babble

About Jessica Ashley

jessicaashley

Jessica Ashley

Jessica Ashley wears inappropriately high heels to the playground and is author of the single-mom-in-the-city blog, Sassafrass. Jessica's work appears on Huffington Post Live, GalTime, TakePart, AOL and Yahoo! Shine, where she was a founding senior editor. She’s the mother of one boy, and the proof is in the pile of Star Wars Lego guys at the bottom of her purse. Read bio and latest posts → Read Jessica's latest posts →

« Go back to Babble Voices

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Comments, together with personal information accompanying them, may be used on Babble.com and other Babble media platforms. Learn More.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *.

Previous Post Next Post

The Daily Babble