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Teaching My Daughter How To Brush Her Teeth

I don’t remember how my mom taught me to brush my teeth. I mean, she must have done something to get me to spend the time in there because I was cavity-free until I was 12. Not only did she convince me to brush but she did it without a toothbrush that played a song or vibrated or swirled or had a cartoon character on it.

My kid was a harder sell.

She’s grown up in a world of Nick, JR and Disney, so she insists that everything she owns be labeled with SOMETHING. Right now her favorite toothbrush features those hilarious dudes Phineas and Ferb (but no Perry, alas) and she’s also totally hooked on her Listerine Kids mouthwash, which is awesome, but has presented a problem: she’s shortchanging her brushing time because she’s so eager to get to the mouthwash.

I know. Total #whitepeopleproblem, right?

So, I did some research, and it was suggested that I teach her a song to brush her teeth to; basically, a song that she can sing in her head and she knows she has to sing it all the way through before she can stop brushing.

The only problem was WHICH song to choose? I mean, she’s six. She knows most of the words to some songs by Victoria Justice and the girls from Shake It Up, but not well enough to sing it in her head. That’s when I finally realized there is one song every kid knows: HAPPY BIRTHDAY.

Yep, I told her to sing all the way through Happy Birthday to both me and her dad (as in she sings “Happy Birthday all the way through using my name, and then again all the way through using her dad’s name) and only THEN can she go ahead and do that fancy pants mouthwash rinsing (and she has to sing Happy Birthday once through her head to herself while she’s rinsing, naturally).

This has totally worked. Win one for me!

I received products from Johnson & Johnson as part of my participation in the LISTERINE® Kids Cavity-Free School Year Program. All thoughts and opinions expressed in this post are my own. Click here to see more of the discussion.

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