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10 Teen Statistics to Help Us Better Understand Our Kids

teen-statistics-graphic

A few days ago, the verdict was released regarding the trial of George Zimmerman in the shooting of Trayvon Martin. Our responsibility as parents of teenagers is to make sure our kids understand the importance of a news story such as this. Reading about the events that took place and following along with the ramifications of the judicial system is the first step toward a landscape where this doesn’t happen.

But are our teenagers following news stories in the news? If so, how do they get their information and from what source? Does a story such as this impact our teenagers at all? If not this, what are the things that concern them?

As I was digging for answers to these questions, I stumbled upon a variety of teen statistics from very different sources. It’s a potpourri of numbers — and like a potpourri, some things are pleasing and some are cloying.

Shall we?

  • Ten things you’ll want to know about your teen 1 of 11
    ten-teen-statistics3
  • They know what’s going on 2 of 11
    teens-know-news1

    Source: stageoflife.com

  • They’re afraid of your reaction 3 of 11
    fear-in-teens-graphic

    Source: stageoflife.com

  • They fight being The Now Generation 4 of 11
    teens-impact-nature1

    Source: stageoflife.com

  • They are easily distracted 5 of 11
    teens-and-sleep1

    Source: National Sleep Foundation

  • The lines of violence as fact or fiction are more blurred 6 of 11
    teens-and-guns-statistic1

    Source: stageoflife.com

  • Constant connectivity threatens the moment 7 of 11
    teens-text-and-drive1

    Source: carinsurance.org

  • They’re involved 8 of 11
    teens-talk-politics1

    Source: stageoflife.com

  • They look outside of their formal education 9 of 11
    teens-read-books1

    Source: stageoflife.com

  • Their future presses in 10 of 11
    teens-worried-economy1

    Source: Money Magazine

  • They fight against hopelessness 11 of 11
    teens-life-expectancy1

    Source: Time Magazine

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