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Your ‘Q’s My ‘A’s: Genealogy, Book of Mormon and Drugs Part 2

So you’re ready for more? Or perhaps you missed the first parts?

The original post can be found here, the one that led to all the great questions.

My first post with answers to several of the questions can be found here.

This post was originally part of the first but TWO THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED WORDS IS TOO MANY WORDS, so I divided it into more bite size chunks, kind of like how they divide king size candy bars into two smaller bars, you can eat them both if you want to, or you have a defined stopping or sharing point. Speaking of, I though I had a Snickers right here…

Anyway, these questions all come from Charlane, she had lots of good questions (and thanks for being patient with the answers!)
How are people with disabilities incorporated into the church?

Just like anyone else! Their capabilities and talents are taken and magnified and they are able to serve in whatever capacity they are able or desire to. My aunt lived as a quadriplegic for over 50 years of her life and she held close to every calling there is to have in the LDS church (working with the little kids was her favorite.) She never went on a mission to a foreign country, but she did serve as a genealogy missionary for over 30 years, helping others around her with extraction of old records and temple work.

Why is genealogy so important in LDS, how does that work and what if you’re adopted?

Oh man, I wish you could talk to my mother-in-law about this one, she’s crazy into genealogy. I’m going to do a little copy and paste here and add in that knowing who we come from and what we come from shapes us in dramatic ways. It was through family history that I was able to find out about my great grandmother suffering from severe postpartum depression, a revelation that changed my life forever.

From Mormon.org about Family History: (emphasis added)

Why are they doing it? Most would probably say because it’s an amusing hobby and they feel motivated by a strong curiosity about their ancestors. It is because they’ve been touched by the spirit of this work.  According to the Old Testament, Elijah was to come back and prepare the way of the Lord. The Spirit of the Lord is the spirit of love that may eventually overcome all human family estrangements as it builds bridges between the generations. It binds beloved grandparents, now deceased, with the grandchildren who never knew them by preserving and sharing their histories and keepsakes. A life not documented is a life that within a generation or two will largely be lost to memory. And yet, knowledge of our ancestors shapes us and instills us with values that give direction and meaning to our lives.

Adoption is a magnificent way many of my friends have been able to add to their own families. Once an adoption is final, children can be sealed to their parents in a temple ceremony for eternity. In many cases when there is an open adoption a lot of work is done to find out the familial history of the adopted child as well as the adoptive family, allowing them to become even closer and understand who their own ancestors are.

What if you want a divorce, do you need to leave the church?

Nope. I covered this one a bit in my last post. Divorce happens to the best of people at the worst of times. What should (and hopefully does) happen is the ward family around the divorced person or parent is as supportive as possible, especially if the person doesn’t have close family or friends nearby.

What is the book of mormon, is it like a bible?

Pardon the copy and paste on this one Charlane, but I know I’d screw it up if I didn’t.

“The Book of Mormon serves as another testament of Jesus Christ and confirms the truths found in the Holy Bible. The Book of Mormon does not replace the Bible; rather they are companion works that together teach about God and Jesus Christ.

Joseph Smith, through God’s inspiration, translated the Book of Mormon from ancient records written on gold plates and taught that it is “the keystone of our religion.”

Both volumes of scripture are a compilation of teachings as recorded by ancient prophets. While the Bible details events in the eastern hemisphere, the Book of Mormon documents the lives of the inhabitants of the Americas, primarily from approximately 600 B.C. through A.D. 421.”

The Book of Mormon is a set of scriptures that coincide with the events of the bible. Did you ever see The Lion King? Let’s say that’s the bible. Now, did you ever see Lion King 1 1/2? That’s the Book of Mormon, same events, same end result, different locations, both written by Disney (but in the case of the Bible and Book of Mormon, they were both written by prophets.) Perhaps that was a horrible analogy, but it’s what I used to describe it to Addie and it made perfect sense to her.
What is the difference between LSD and other Christians?

LSD is a drug and hardly Christian at all (Or maybe it is? I’ve never done drugs, well, not that drug at least.). Kidding, the LSD/LDS slip up is common. As is the Mormon/Moron slip up. Ironic, no? The biggest differences are the ones I discussed in my other post (marriage for eternity, organization and clergy) as well as the fact that we believe in and sustain a living prophet who still receives revelations from Christ about the organization of the LDS church and its members today and everyday. We also have temples and temple service (see next question/previous questions).

And finally what is the temple all about, is it like a super fancy church, and can non-Mormons go in?

I think this one was answered pretty well in my last post, but just in case someone is skimming (naughty) or jumping around, the temple is about advanced learning and receiving blessings in exchange for making very serious covenants with God. Nothing goes on inside the temple that would shock or offend the littlest of old lady, it is just a place one must be prepared to go to (and that’s what church is for, preparation).

Phew! Thanks for hanging with me through all of that, and for being so kind about all of it.

Any more questions?

Photo Credit: Flickr

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