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Rice Cereal Can Wait: Baby's First Foods

Have you heard of Dr. Greene? Founder of The Whiteout Movement?

The who and the what now? I had the same reaction. Not too begrudgingly I clicked the link, having piqued my interest – because the sharing source was a good one.

A friend who’s not into all the latest and greatest baby-care fads – nothing too over-zealous or over-the-top crunchy. Just a down-to-earth, resourceful mama, eager to start down a good path of nutrition with her baby. Just like me. Just like you. Given that you have a baby of course.

In a Nutshell…Habit vs. Science

It’s all about baby’s first foods. Or moving away from the lack thereof. As in not white rice cereal. Sure white rice baby cereal is fortified with iron. Yes, it’s the least allergenic of grains. Which is why it’s been the reigning grand pooba of a baby’s first food. It’s also chock full of empty carbs and sugar. Essentially, ‘junk food for babies’ as Dr. Greene puts it. Which makes sense.

Historically Speaking…

I’m less than a couple of months away from making Lil’ Abner baby-food, and I’ve been getting excited about it. I’m a big-time foodie and pretty much throw down in the kitchen. That’s right, I’m tooting my own horn. It’s okay to do that sometimes. I was always a firm believer that baby food did not have to be bland, pureed swill. With our first,  I did a combo of flavourful purees and baby-led weaning.

Pureed or not, with…spices! Gasp! Cayenne pepper was a big hit. I KID people. I’m talking herbs like basil and thyme.

Of course, there was the initial introduction to it all. Hence where the term baby steps comes from I’m thinking. (Well one of the reasons anyways). One food at a time, so if baby does have an allergic reaction, you know which food it was. Also? Their little tummies are pretty sensitive, having only consumed breastmilk or formula for the past 6 months or so. They can’t handle a potluck yet, pureed or not.

Alas. I too, started with the rice cereal first. Granted, I was keen enough to know that whole grain, brown rice baby cereal was better than the white business. After a week of that, we then started in with the suggestions much like the ones in the slideshow below. 1 new addition per week. Let it be said that I did not buy any crazy expensive gadgets to make any of this action, my trusty hand-blender or a fork did the job just fine.

Here & Now

I’m liking this campaign. That there is no need to start your baby out with rice cereal as your baby’s first food. Unless of course, your pediatrician or naturopath recommends it, because your baby was born pre-term or has low iron levels. Learn more about iron deficiency here. If this is the case – the times, they times are a changing, they might even suggest putting meat onto your little one’s menu.

So, love me or leave me – I’m just sharing of the internets yo. Join the campaign if you think it’s clever and bang on. You’re the boss. For now anyways. Wait till you hit Toddler-hood. *Insert evil laugh here*

Baby’s 1st Food Train (you might as well get used to such coin-phrases, right about now.)

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First timer? It’s a grand idea to consult with your doctor, pediatrician, naturopath – whatever form of medial care you’ve got going on – if you are unsure of what the high allergen foods for babies are. There’s also this handy dandy chart from Wholesome Baby Food, which is how I began my foray into baby food making. This is a fantastic site overall, one which I consulted almost daily in my research and learning path of all things baby food. They’re avid supporters of Dr. G’s findings and his campaign, as is The Healthy Child, Healthy World blog. Told you that you didn’t have to take my word for it.

I’m Your Friend…

Read Dr. Greene’s White Paper: “Why White Rice Cereal for Babies Must Go.”

Download his, “Quick Guide to Starting Solids.”

Dr. G on the Twitters & Facebook.

Follow my owm geekery on my blog, the Twitters — or connect with me on Facebook.

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