Amber Teething Necklaces: Yay or Nay?

Since Avery started teething last month, I’ve been researching ways to help relieve some of the pain that she is going through during this process. She is much more vocal and bothersome by teething than Harlan was, so having to deal with it is new to me.

For the past three nights the teething seems to be really bad. She always has her hands in her mouth, is drooling constantly, and will cry with very little that can soothe her. It’s beginning to interrupt her sleep at night, which is completely not like her.

I’ve tried a few teethers that we had in the freezer and it will console her for a little bit, but then she will start to cry again. I really would like to refrain from giving her medicine just yet because she is still so young.

Going through some of my research on natural ways to soothe teething, I came across many people talking about amber teething necklaces. I had never even heard of amber teething necklaces when I had my first daughter. I’ve seen them before on babies and heard some moms talk about it on twitter, but didn’t know if they actually do work or if it’s all hype.

Amber contains succinic acid which is said to naturally ease pain and reduce inflammation. When the child wears the amber necklace, their body heat releases the succinic acid into the bloodstream and it stimulates the thyroid gland to reduce the drooling.

My first thought on these necklaces is that they scare me. Putting something around a little baby’s neck that might pose a risk of choking. After doing more research and realizing that if they are supervised while wearing it, the likeliness of that happening is very slim. My second thought was, maybe it’s worth trying so that it can provide her with some relief and comfort.

What do you think, do they work or are they all hype? 

More from Lauren on Baby’s First Year:

Read more from Lauren at A Mommy in the City. For more updates, follow Lauren on Facebook and Twitter! Check out more of Lauren’s  Babble posts at Being Pregnant and Baby’s First Year.

Image via Amazon

Tagged as:

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.