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Top 25 Autism Spectrum Blogs

We've updated the list: To view 2012's Top 30 Autism Spectrum Blogs, click here!

The web has become a critical part of life for those impacted by autism, including many, many parents. It's not only an invaluable tool for quickly distributing information, but it's also an incredible source of community for those raising kids on the spectrum. Blogs, in particular, have provided those coping with autism a way to share their individual experiences and see that they are far from alone in their challenges and their triumphs. Read More ↓
There are hundreds and hundreds (if not thousands!) of great autism spectrum blogs out there, representing a wide diversity of perspectives, but together they demonstrate one thing: a commitment to bringing ASD issues out into the open, making it less and less possible to ignore families who live with them every day. Choosing just 25 blogs to highlight here was no small feat; those selected are Autism Speaks staff favorites, but this is by no means an exhaustive list. We easily could have doubled or tripled the number here with the addition of many other beloved voices we return to again and again. If there are others you would add, we hope you'll share them with us. In the meantime, thank you for joining us and Babble in celebrating those listed here. - Kai MacMahon, Autism Speaks

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Susan Senator | Susan Senator

Top 25 Autism Spectrum Blogs - Susan Senator

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Susan Senator

Susan’s running account of her experiences as a mom to her 21-year-old son Nat, who has severe autism, is a strong reminder that families do not end after kids turn 18, but that they are constantly a “work in progress” – forever growing, learning, and changing together. Other parents of young adults on the spectrum will appreciate her refusal to sugarcoat her family’s experiences, and the way she manages the precarious balances between realism and optimism: “Autism has provided a certain shape to our family structure,” she writes. “Things have been very difficult for us, and yet autism is not a death sentence. Autism is not the end of the world; just the end of one kind of world.”

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15 thoughts on “Top 25 Autism Spectrum Blogs 2011

  1. Marlie says:

    AFAIC that’s the best aneswr so far!

  2. Michele Sanchez Portland Maine says:

    Loving the adventurous spirit!! Thanks for sharing

  3. emmas says:

    Nowadays, in France, 650.000 individuals are affected by autism, and it goes up to 2 millions if you include their close family members
    Condemned by the European Council in 2004, France is still very late in the area of research and adapted care for autism.

    With the promotional films called Les Electeurs (The Voters), VAINCRE LAUTISME calls on the French government, the politicians and the public. Autistic people have been left for a long time on the fringe of society. They still suffer from legislative, political, administrative and social discriminations.

    VAINCRE LAUTISME asks for a parliamentary commission to study autism in France, as well as an economic study on the cost of autism in France, and a specific legislation, adapted to the peculiarities of the autistic persons needs. VAINCRE LAUTISME also stands up for the creation of the Autism General States, a moratorium against Packing and a ruling against unsuitable cares.

    In 2012, every French autistic individual and his/her family will take into account the politicians commitment before voting.

    Check the videos on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwvnNyN6nj0 and http://vaincrelautisme2012.com/

  4. Beth Whitehouse says:

    Great blogs! You should check out http://www.bigcalfguy.com. It is an autism awareness blog by a dad and it rocks!

  5. Laura says:

    Just adding my blog to the list of many autism blogs. Have been blogging since 2006 on my experiences as a university student on the spectrum and am now completing my Master’s.

  6. Great blogs on the list. I just wanted to post my blog. I document my days of raising my son who has autism as well as autism related material on my blog.

  7. nice article, internet is a great medium for people related to autistic children and parents who raise them to know more about it and give proper care to their kind hearted child.

  8. Stefanie says:

    I have found myself during this Christmas vacation facing mornings riddled with anxiety. My husband and I are both teachers and we have three children, our youngest who is seven is a high functioning autistic child. The unknown is what is throwing me for a loop and I am beginning to realize how he must feel without structure in his day. Our son has ABA therapy five days a week and this includes a weekend outing. His schedule is different due to the holidays and my husband and I as well as our two other children are home. I feel angst, fear and distrust of the unknown. Every hour that passes suceessfully without an outburst or a non compliance is a victory. He just returned from his outing and the last half hour was non compliant-he had a different therapist and refused to keep his seatbelt on on the way home. The therapist dealt with the situation well, but at home he refused to tell the truth about what happened and then had a melt down. Why do I take his failure so much to heart that I feel like a failure. My husband and I both dealt with it with him, however I could simply cry. Is the fear of the constant daily uncertainty a reality for other moms? I feel it would help me greatly to be in touch with others so that I can better understand.

  9. melissa says:

    Hi Stephanie,
    For a minute I thought I wrote your post. We also have 3 kids, I’m a teacher, and our oldest has high functioning autism.
    Yes, the daily uncertainty is a Huge fear for me and worry how he will function without me!
    If you want to be in touch. reply with your email.
    melissa

  10. Bob Moldashel says:

    Hi Stephanie,

    I am the stepfather of a 21 year old child on the spectrum and one thing I have learned over the past 19 years is that what works today…..may not work tomorrow.

    Same goes for medication. Meds and dosages have changed as he has gotten older and outburst or “non-compliance” as you call it, change over time.

    I consider myself fortunate because he is quite high functioning but that doesn’t make it easier.

    My wife has expressed the same feelings you have and the important thing I think to understand is that you are not a failure. I try to look at it as a puzzle and a challenge constantly trying to figure out what works and what doesn’t. My wife has become the expert puzzle solver. I am more the frustrated partner.

    All the best to you and your family in the new year.

    -B-

  11. C Ford says:

    Have been checking this list and wondering how to join and get more people to participate on my blog…am a mom of an adult autistic young man and have about 350+ excerpts about our journey???would love to have more interaction with others. my topics range from medical and educational issues to personal challenges and reflection.Thanks for the opportunity to connect with others.

  12. Jan says:

    I am also the mom of an adult with autism and would love to read your blog. In the past I have tended to insulate my feelings until I feel awful. Am interested in being in touch with other parents of adults with autism so we can share out joys and sorrows and also maybe share advice.

  13. Wilda Richardson says:

    Intoo was worried about the change in schedule over the christmas break. I found that my 5 yr son loved the change. Sometimes our kids need a break from the structure and therapies and just be given a chance to relax and be themselves. He returned to his class compliant and with minimal agression and outbursts.

  14. I am a mom of 3 all born with high functioning ASD. There have been many challenges but all worth it! I wanted to share with you how to earn extra money for activities that county services can’t pay for. Check out my site and let me know if there are any questions! Niohio.nerium.com

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