Big Babies and C-Sections

big baby

My big baby Fuzzball

Both my babies were born via c-section. The first was an emergency c-section after 42 or (or so) hours of labor when finally, after being dilated to almost 10 cm, my doctor decided it was not wise to push my baby out due to his decelerating heart rate. As it turned out, he had a true knot in his umbilical cord which could’ve been preventing him from moving into position. He ended up spending three (agonizing) days and nights in the NICU.

My second (Fuzzball) was born via planned c-section after a ton of thinking and research about whether or not a VBAC was a good option for me. I even changed doctors at 37 weeks. I finally decided that even though I didn’t really want a planned C, it was probably the best way to get my baby out (since he had to come out, right?).

Although my boys were both around 8 ½ lbs (Fuzz was a little more), I still don’t think that’s so gigantic to warrant a ‘big baby’ label. To me, a big baby is over 9lbs. 8 and change is sort of on the big side of medium, you know what I mean? Regardless, when I was around 35 weeks, my doctor started playing the “big baby” card.

What is that, you ask?

Countless times I’ve heard people telling me stories of how their doctors told them (warned them?) that they had a really big baby. To me, this plants a seed of anxiety that could make a woman fear her inability to birth.

Plenty of women have birthed large babies without having a c-section. Look at Miranda Kerr! She birthed a 10 pounder without any drugs!

I understand there is often a need for a C (my case, for example), but to instill a kind of fear in a pregnant lady for no real reason seems totally unfair and inappropriate.

The other piece of this is that often, doctors are wrong about the weight of a baby up to a pound in either direction. So their babies might not be so big after all.

What if doctors weren’t allowed to mention to patients the size of their babies. Do you think this would help prevent a lot of C-sections?

 

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