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Coming Up Short

Earlier this week, I noticed this old Carolyn Hax article making the rounds with my Facebook friends. To summarize the piece, a woman writes in questioning how her friends with kids could possibly be busy all day and she even mentions that she thinks we all might be lying about what a good time we are having staying home. Carolyn sums up perfectly how hard it can be to get things done with children in tow, but the whole thing got me thinking about what it’s like being a stay-at-home mom (or to be more accurate, a work-at-home mom).

No one has ever criticized me for how little I accomplish in a day. My husband is incredibly understanding when he finds me still in my pajamas exasperated that my to-do list went largely undone. But I criticize myself. I naively start the week with high expectations only to be too tired or too busy with Tate to get much of anything done.

I will admit that before I had Tate, I idealized being a stay-at-home mom. At the time, I was working at a job I didn’t care for and thought that once I stayed home, I might actually have time for a few projects. I thought there would be time to sew, to decorate, to bake, and to write. I love being home, but it’s so much harder than I ever expected.

And to make matters worse, I get caught up comparing myself to other moms in the blogosphere, who inexplicably find time to care for their kiddies, make and cook beautiful things, and somehow document everything with pristine photography on their blogs. I don’t expect to “do it all”, but it sure would be nice.

Do you find yourself frustrated by how little you get done? And am I the only one comparing myself to everyone else and feeling that I am coming up short?

Read more of Madeline’s writing at Uber Chic for Cheap.
And don’t miss a post! Follow Madeline on Twitter and Facebook.

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