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Elizabeth Banks Says Celeb Moms Are Doing a "Disservice" to Other Moms

I’ll be the first to tell you that your body takes an unexpected turn after having a baby. Especially after having more than one child. I was probably overly proud of the way my body bounced back after having my first child. I worked out so much throughout my entire pregnancy, that I was back to my pre-pregnancy jeans within a week of giving birth to Harlan.

I set the same expectations for myself after having Avery even though I didn’t step foot in the gym during my pregnancy with her (I had severe morning sickness throughout my pregnancy which left me doing close to nothing.) So when I couldn’t even get my pre-pregnancy jeans over my thigh a week after having Avery, I started feeling sorry for myself.

To make matters worse, I’d attend events with celebrities that just had babies and were looking skinnier than ever. I’d look at my body and then look at theirs and realize that mine didn’t resemble theirs in the least. Had I set my expectations too high? Absolutely! Did it take me a while to realize that? You bet.

Finally celeb moms are speaking out on the bar being set too high by other celebrity moms that are back into their size zero jeans within a matter of weeks after having a baby. As The Huffington Post reported, Elizabeth Banks even goes as far as to calling it a “disservice” to what some celebrity moms are showing other mothers. The actress, who has two children via surrogate, told the host of “WTF” podcast how she really feels about fellow celebrity mothers that seem to be back in their pre-pregnancy weight shortly after having a baby:

“I like to believe that if I had carried my own baby, I would have bounced back. But who knows? And by the way, it’s such a horrible — women should not be expected to bounce back … it’s a, I think, a true disservice what’s going on right now with all these celebrity moms … first of all, I just want to remind people that celebrities generally are genetically superior human beings on a certain level anyway … they’re mostly thin, you know, they got trainers, they work out, they’ve got money, they’ve got the ability, you know, and they are normally genetically predisposed to being thin people anyway, so like these women who are holding up, you know, certain people as their benchmark after they’ve had a child, like just go be with your kid for a minute … don’t get to the gym right away. It’s alright. This is not how it’s supposed to be, everybody. Calm down.”

Although I try to stay away from the gossip magazines and the celebrity websites, it’s hard to stay away. Let’s face it, our society is celebrity obsessed. When we see that these women are looking absolutely amazing just minutes (it feels that way anyway) after having a baby, we start to think that we should (and can) look the same way too. But just as Banks points out, unless you are genetically blessed, have a trainer at your disposal, and someone to help take care of your baby while you focus most of your time on getting your body back, I just don’t think it’s possible.

Avery is nearing a year old and I am finally starting to see a glimpse of what my body looked like before I had her. But that is because I am taking time out of my day to work out in the gym. Because of me being a WAHM and the lack of time, I only make it to the gym once a week, two if I’m lucky. If I had my way, I’d be in the gym every day, but it’s just not realistic. My priorities in my life are my family and making sure that they are well taken care of. They are the ones that need me right now. My body can wait.

More from Lauren on Baby’s First Year:

 

Read more from Lauren at her personal blog, A Mommy in the City, where she chronicles her life living in New York City with a suburban mentality. For more updates, follow Lauren on FacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram! Check out more of Lauren’s Babble posts at Being Pregnant and Baby’s First Year.

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