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FDA Declares Ban on All BPA in Baby Bottles and Sippy Cups

BPA

BPA has been banned from all baby bottles by the FDA

Bisphenol-A, or BPA, is no longer welcome in the materials that make up baby bottles and sippy cups, according to The Huffington Post (via the Associated Press).

The announcement came earlier this week from the Food and Drug Administration, although virtually all manufacturers had already done away with BPA voluntarily.

BPA is a plastic-hardening chemical that has caused alarm in recent years, particularly as it relates to negative health effects in babies and toddlers.

The American Chemistry Council “had asked the Food and Drug Administration to phase out rules allowing BPA in those products in October, after determining that all manufacturers of bottles and sippy cups had already abandoned the chemical due to safety concerns,” the Associated Press reported.

“Consumers can be confident that [baby bottles and sippy cups] do not contain BPA,” FDA spokesman Allen Curtis said in a statement. “The agency continues to support the safety of BPA for use in products that hold food.”

Some members of Congress have also introduced legislation that would ban BPA in all canned food, water bottled and food containers, even though chemical makers argue BPA is safe for “all food and drink uses.”

On the flip side, numerous researchers have found that BPA can “interfere with development of the reproductive and nervous systems in babies and young children” based on tests done in rodents and other animals. The fear is that BPA mimics the effects of estrogen and can be the cause of early onset puberty in girls, among other health concerns.

However, the FDA has said the findings aren’t applicable to humans, which is why they’re currently spending millions looking into the effects of BPA on humans.

According to public safety advocates, the new BPA ban for bottles and sippy cups “would have little impact,” since the chemical in those products has been nonexistent for a while now.

Photo credit: iStock

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