Categories

Flirting with Insomnia

The World's Most Inconsistent Sleeper

I’ve always been a good, deep sleeper. Five minutes after my head hit the pillow, I’d be out. No tossing, no turning, just uninterrupted sleep for at least 8, if not 9 hours.

It didn’t matter when I went to bed, if I had a deadline at work, a busy day planned, heck even as a kid I’d sleep like baby on Christmas Eve.

Nothing bothered me and my slumber.

Until now.

I’m working on 5 months of interrupted sleep daily. For me this has been an eternity even though I know it’s nothing compared to other parents.

Little Bean isn’t a bad sleeper, he just requires more feedings and his “schedule” if you want to call it that, is inconsistent. Some days it’s 1 mid-night feeding, possible around 4 AM. Other nights he could be up at 12, 2, 4 and 6. And then there’s the glorious full night of sleep that he flirts with every few weeks.

There’s no pattern that I can decipher and it’s KILLING ME.

The problem lies not in his inability to fall back to sleep after nursing, but mine. I wake up, stumble into his room to nurse, and dream of my pillow.

You’d think once I hit that pillow I’d fall right back to sleep as he has, but I don’t. Instead I lay there. Listening to the husbands breathing, thinking of the day, planning tomorrow.

I can’t shut down.

Maybe I’m the one who needs Sleep Training.

According to Dr. Rafael Pelayo of Stanford University’s Sleep Medicine Center, repeated nights of interrupted sleep often leads to a permanent sleep disorder. Insomniacs have more cortisol, the stress hormone, and spend their nights in a hyper-vigilant state.

In the article Dr. Pelayo gives some tips and says it can take up to two months to sleep train yourself. But what’s the point if your kids can’t sleep through the night yet? Shouldn’t I wait until he’s a bit more consistent? Aren’t I just teasing myself if I try now?

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as: , , , ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest