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Huck Standard Time

We’ve been back from the west coast for four whole nights now.  I got myself back on EST pretty easily. Huck, however hard I am trying, is taking his sweet time, preferring still to go to bed near 10 pm and wake up at . . . wait for it . . . 10:45 am.

Obviously this has set my poor sleep-deprived brain to scheming . . .

Now, clearly, the boy is jet-lagged. Someone save the poor jet-lagged boy! And we are working at getting him back to his usual 8:30/8:30 schedule, we are. But at the same time . . . dude. Dude! Did you hear me? 10:45! This means I have time to stay up well past a proper bed time and still get nearly 8 hours of sleep! Do you know how long it has been since I had a full 8 hours of sleep?

And this got me to thinking. Why don’t we do this, like, on purpose? Mom and Dad on Eastern Standard Time, Baby Huck on Huck Standard Time. Genius! Genius? Could we be a dual time zone family? So I did some research into the wisdom of the 7:00-8:00 bedtime. This is what I found out:

 

According to Pediatric Services:

“Keeping an infant (or any young child) up late for any reason does not result in the infant or child sleeping later the next morning. Instead, keeping the infant or child up late means only that valuable sleep time is lost, and both the child and family ‘pay the price’ the following day when the infant is is fussy, irritable, cranky, and/or whiny.”

Right, “keeping a baby up,” sure. But clearly, babies in New York are going to go to bed three hours earlier than babies in California, and obviously not every baby in California is waking up cranky just because their bedtime happens to be later.

I’m over-thinking this, I think.

But still.

Just me?

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