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Infant CPR--Are You Prepared?

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A few months ago, a woman in my building contacted me about taking an infant CPR training course. She is a babysitter by trade (both human babies and puppy babies), and at the time I felt like it was all a ploy to get me to think, “Wow, she’s trained in this kind of stuff, in case poop hits the fan. I should hire her!” Sneaky. But also, I thought, “Shoot! Infant CPR! I should learn that! But maybe if I don’t learn it I won’t need it?”

Pretty watertight thinking there, am I right?

Of course, denying you’ll need to use emergency training is not a sure fire way to avoid needing emergency training, and so when I heard about Partners For Safety and their at-home Infant CPR training course I was all over it, and had a DVD shipped to me immediately.

And then of course it sat on the dresser for another month while I worked up the guts to watch it. Like I said, as long as I don’t know how to do it, I won’t have to . . . right?

After the jump, A POP QUIZ! To see how well you know your stuff! Get excited! (I’ll also share a few basic techniques, you know, so you’re covered should you–gulp–need it.)


  • HOW DID YOU DO? 1 of 2
    HOW DID YOU DO?
  • 2 of 2
    Thanks, Partners For Safety!

(I made that quiz myself, don’t knock my rad graphic design skillz, yo.)

AND NOW: BASIC CPR FOR INFANT NOT BREATHING WITH NO PULSE

1. Check for breathing. If not breathing, have someone call 911. If alone, treat for 2 minutes before calling 911.

2. Place on firm, flat surface. Tilt head back slightly to open airway.

3. Cover nose and mouth with your mouth. Blow 2 gentle breaths.

4. Recheck for breathing and pulse.

5. Apply CPR: 30 chest compressions, 1/2 to one 1″ deep, then 2 breaths.

6. Continue until baby recovers or emergency help arrives.

TREATING A CHOKING INFANT

1. Support baby’s neck with your arm.

2. Position baby face down so head is lower than body.

3. Apply 5 back blows between shoulder blades with one hand.

4. Turn baby over on back.

5. Support neck. Keep head lower than chest.

6. Apply 5 chest thrusts, using 2-3 fingers. Compress about 1″ deep.

7. Repeat process until object is removed, or until help arrives.

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