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ISR: The swim technique that could save your baby's life

I was 8 years old before I took my first swimming lesson. I remember feeling panicky as I sat with my legs dangling into the deep end next to kids half my age. I had almost drowned as a toddler when I silently slipped away from my mother’s side and no one heard or saw me fall into a neighborhood pool. I wasn’t breathing when they pulled me from the water, and although I didn’t have any long term physical effects from the experience, I was terrified of water for a long time.

When it comes to the safety of my own children, teaching them to swim is at the top of my list of ways to keep them safe. While most of the swim classes available are about teaching children to have fun in the water, there is an incredible swim technique that goes beyond just teaching them to kick and splash. It’s plain and simple about teaching them to survive in the water and can actually enable them to save their own life.

The first time I saw a video of ISR: Infant Swimming Research on youtube, I couldn’t believe what I was watching.  An infant under a year old  was able to flip themself face up and float on top of the water. This technique could be the difference between life or death for an infant or small child who accidently fell into a pool.  The lessons are taught by certified instructors to children 6 months old to 6 years old and require the child to attend 10 minute lessons, 5 days a week, for 6 weeks.

With warm weather upon us and sparkling blue swimming pools beckoning us all to jump in, this incredible survival swim training for infants may be of interest to many parents out there. To find a certified ISR swim trainer in your area, visit the ISR Website.

~Melissa

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