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Teething Relief: Why You Shouldn't Use Teething Gels

Skip the teething gel, try Hylands!

I have a teething baby … every day she gets closer to breaking a tooth through those cute little gums is a day she isn’t really too happy or full of smiles.

Two weeks ago, I did a post about my top 10 teething remedies that work best for our family, and I really couldn’t live without.  Then I read something on teething gels and the recall from months ago.  Yup!  I am late on that one!

But then I learned exactly why we shouldn’t be using teething gel with our precious little ones!  Most teething gels contain something called benzocaine which the FDA now advises against for teething pain relievers.

While some over the counter teething gels are working to remove benzocaine from their product, are all of them doing it?  Better safe than sorry, if you ask me!

What benzocaine can cause in infants is called methemolobinemia, which, while rare in children, can be very serious.  What methemolobinemia does is cause a decreased amount of oxygen in an infant’s blood stream.

The American Academy of Pediatrics as well as the FDA recommends alternative pain relievers, many of which I listed myself in my top 10 teething remedies.

If you still want to try a teething gel, since the recall baby orajel has come out with a new alcohol-, dye-, and benzocaine-free naturals line of baby teething gels available over the counter.  Also, after the late 2010 recall of teething tablets, Hyland’s has a new and improved line of teething tablets back on shelves all over the United States, and Canada.

We have been able to try the new teething tablets since they are available in our area, and they have been working wonders with Addie during her teething right now!

I highly recommend Hyland’s Teething Tablets!

Oh, and our next goal is to give Sophie the Giraffe a try … Moms, is it worth the money?

 

Babble suggests these 11 Baby Teething Remedies!

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