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Teething? Already?

My daughter is 4 and a half months old so she can’t be teething, right? Sure, she drools like a mastiff and sticks her fingers in her mouth all the time but hey! She’s a baby! They’re drooly finger suckers. No reason to think anything was up. Until yesterday when she was gnawing on one of my fingers and I found the tip of a tooth. Yep. A tooth. A canine tooth, to be exact.

Everything about this is catching me off guard.

I had no idea when teething is really supposed to start because my son was another early teether. I think his first tooth came in around 5 and a half months. I assumed he was an outlier and that my daughter would teethe later but apparently beating her brother is the thing to do so she got a tooth faster. I did a little reading and found out that 6 months is the average for teeth but it can start as early as 3 months or as late as 12 months. So…any time really. And there’s a loose order teeth usually come in – bottom incisors, then top incisors, then molars, then canines – but they can come in in different orders, too. A friend of mine who’s a pediatrician told me on Facebook that she’s seen teeth come in in all kinds of order.

In other words, teething is a free for all. Your baby might fit the pattern or might be a rugged individualist. Expect the unexpected!

Teething can cause a baby a whole lot of discomfort. You might see fussing, drooling, restlessness, sleeplessness and chewing on hands or toys. But not always. My son’s first few teeth appeared like ninjas with no warning. If your baby is having a tough time cutting teeth, talk to your pediatrician about how to relieve the discomfort.

Source: WebMD

Read more from Rebekah at Mom-in-a-Million, The DC MomsThe Broad Side Follow Rebekah on Facebook and Twitter too!

Photo credit: Photo Stock

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