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The Case Against Rice Cereal

I thought I knew it all. But apparently, I’ve been hiding under a bumbo seat or something, because I learned yesterday that feeding Paul rice cereal is soooo two-thousand and late.

Like, it’s apparently a better idea to just go ahead and completely skip over it, moving directly into more nutrient rich food, such as fruit and vegetable purees.

But why is rice cereal bad? I need to know!

So of course I did what I always do when I have tough parenting questions, I asked the internet.

Here’s what I’ve learned, the case AGAINST rice cereal:

  • Rice cereal is low in protein and high in carbohydrates.
  • It’s totally an old school baby food. Basically, rice cereal is a cultural tradition, dating back to the 1950’s. It was thought to be a good place to start because it was considered to be “safe food”, given growing concerns about food allergies.
  • There are no real nutrients to rice cereal, only empty calories.
  • It’s bland, with little real flavor or texture.
  • Rice cereal is a grain, and grain is hard to digest, which can result in constipation.

With the quick research I did this evening, I agree there is a strong case against skipping the rice cereal completely. It appears to me that if you feed your baby rice cereal, it’s not bad for the baby, it’s just that there are choices that are better.

So I made a decision. Paul won’t be fed “warm baby mush” as a first food. Instead, we’re going to go with more nutrient rich choices such as pureed sweet potatoes, bananas, avocados and prunes.

image credit.

Did you skip the rice cereal? What was your baby’s first food?

Read more from Emily on her blog, DesignHER Momma. Follow along on Facebook, Twitter , and Pinterest.

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