What the WHAT? Vintage Ads Show Babies Wrapped in Cellophane (PHOTOS)

Babies wrapped in cellophane

You might laugh if it wasn't so horrifying

You probably hear it all the time: About how just a few generations ago no kids wore bike helmets and moms smoked and drank while pregnant and no babies were strapped into car seats and everyone lived.

Fine. But in what universe was it ever an acceptable sight to see babies wrapped up in plastic? Not like a plastic bib around their neck or sitting on a couch with a protective cover. But literally wrapped in plastic. You know, the stuff that we move mountains to avoid having our babies and children play around. You know, because of the very real suffocation hazard.

Check out these vintage ads for cellophane from the 1930s-1950s. They might be funny. You know, if they were so utterly terrifying:

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  • Special delivery 1 of 7
    Special delivery
    From the stork straight to the morgue?
  • Cellophane keeps cigarettes and babies fresh as can be 2 of 7
    Cellophane keeps cigarettes and babies fresh as can be
    If only there were another way to keep babies fresh.
    Hmmm.?
  • Double the goodness 3 of 7
    Double the goodness
    Half the air.
  • Not as tempting as a baby 4 of 7
    Not as tempting as a baby
    Because without wrapping a tiny human life in cellophane, you might not know just how tasty it can be.
  • So many good things 5 of 7
    So many good things
    So little time.
    No, really. The clock is ticking. Enjoy them before they turn blue.
  • As you should be 6 of 7
    As you should be
    Cellophane: Protects evil blouses, pantyhose babies. But especially evil babies.
  • Will the bacon be stored with the babies? 7 of 7
    Will the bacon be stored with the babies?
    At least the babies wrapped inside won't have to worry about flies.
    Wrap them in cellophane and they won't have to worry about much, in fact, and definitely not flies.

All images courtesy of Retronaut.co

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