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Mastering The "No Heat Challenge"

Mastering The No Heat ChallengeIt’s true that heat can be brutal on your hair. Excessive use of your favorite heat appliance can leave you with dry, brittle ends. It’s recommend limiting the amount of heat used on your hair year round. It’s for this very reason that many top bloggers and vloggers are leading an online challenge, the “No Heat Challenge.”

I know it’s the beginning of December, so the “No Heat Challenge” can have some definite pitfalls this time of year. No one wants to go outside with a wet head. You could freeze to death. Here are 10 Hair Tools That Can Cut Your Drying Time in Half.

Before beginning this challenge, it’s important to know that going heatless isn’t going to mend or repair damaged split ends. The best way to treat split ends is by cutting them and then preventing them from occurring. I talk more about this here.

With that said, the purpose of going heatless is to improve and maintain the health of your hair. But be mindful that hair is most fragile when wet. Heat can be a culprit of breakage, but mechanical breakage from combing and styling can be just as severe.

Limiting your use of heat is beneficial for any head of hair, but completely eliminating it isn’t necessary to grow long and healthy hair. As I mentioned previously, there are other types of breakage, and heat isn’t the sole cause of breakage and split ends. If you’re noticing an excess of hair on your bathroom floor, taking a full assessment of your hair regimen is more beneficial than singling out one aspect of your regimen such as heat. You can decrease your use of the blow dryer to once a week and still see great results on healthy hair. Additionally, using a heat protectant and towel drying prior to blow drying can also prevent heat damage.

If you decide that the “No Heat Challenge” is for you, you can find 3 Tips For Surviving The No Heat Challenge.

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