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5 Ingredient Guinness Quick Bread

Here is a quick and easy recipe for Guinness bread, perfect for St. Patrick’s Day or any day of the year. This is a great beer bread to go with your corn beef and cabbage or shepherd’s pie tonight. This recipe is too easy, it’s got just 5 ingredients. It uses self-rising flower, brown sugar, a pinch of salt and Guinness. How could you get any easier? I adapted this recipe from Hank Shaw’s Guinness and molasses Bread recipe you can find here. While his recipe is super simple, I was out of molasses, and didn’t want to go out to pick it up, so I substituted brown sugar. Since brown sugar is flavored with molasses, it worked fine.  When it comes out of the oven, rub a stick of butter all over it, so it melts. I used about 2 tablespoons doing this. I sliced it and served it slathered in butter, it’s too good.

You can substitute all purpose flour in this recipe too, but make sure to add 1 1/4 teaspoon baking powder and 1/8 teaspoon salt for every cup of flour used. You can also use other beers, but I’d stick to a dark, or at least a Killian’s red.

Make sure to also check the date on your self rising flour. It goes bad after a period of time and will not rise because it contains baking powder.

5 Ingredient Guinness Quick Bread

Ingredients
3 cups self rising flour
1 cup brown sugar, not packed
a pinch of salt
1 – 11.2 oz Bottle of Guinness
Butter

Method

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine all ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Whisk together and pour into a buttered loaf pan.

2. Bake for 50 – 60 minutes at 350 degrees, or until bread passes the toothpick test. Slather with butter when it first comes out of the oven, about 2 tablespoons. Serve sliced with butter.

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