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A Simple Corned Beef & Cabbage Recipe

Corned beef and cabbage is a pretty traditional St. Patrick’s Day meal – and a perfect midwinter feast, when there’s not much in season yet but there are still potatoes and carrots in cool storage. I had been noticing corned beef brisket in the meat section of the grocery store for years, idly thinking it would be something my Ukrainian (and carnivorously salt-loving) husband would like, but not really knowing what to do with it. It turned out to be brilliant for the slow cooker all I did was upend the package into the pot, cover it with water, and set it for 6 hours. At that point we pulled the brisket out of its broth and set it aside, added some baby potatoes, chunked carrots and wedges of cabbage to the broth this is also called New England Boiled Dinner – and cranked the slow cooker up to high to cook them. Alternatively you could cook the brisket on the stovetop, or pour the broth into a pot and do the same thing you wind up with these fantastically salty, seasoned veg to go with the meat.

Corned Beef & Cabbage

2-3 lb corned beef brisket
4 large or 10 new potatoes, thin skinned, quartered if large
3 carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
1 small head cabbage, cut into small wedges

Place corned beef in large pot or Dutch oven and cover with water. Cover pot and bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Simmer for 45 minutes per pound, or until tender. Alternatively, do the same on low in a slow cooker for 6-8 hours.

Add potatoes and carrots and cook until the vegetables are almost tender; add cabbage and cook for 10 more minutes, until everything is tender. (If you’re using a slow cooker, remove the meat and let it rest; add the vegetables to the broth, turn it up to high and cook for 20-30 minutes, until the veg are tender.) Pull the meat apart with forks or slice it across the grain; serve with the vegetables, covered in broth. Serves 8.

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