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How to Make Gravy: a Turkey Gravy Recipe from Drippings

how to make gravy, gravy recipe, turkey gravy from drippingsGravy is the crowning glory of any turkey dinner (or wait – is that the stuffing?) – regardless, good gravy can make a meal. If you have some nice, dark, sticky drippings in the bottom of your pan, you have a great base for a fantastic gravy. Here’s an easy way to do it, and a few tips to make it richer, darker, and lump-free.

Toasting your flour first in a dry pan until it turns golden will make for a richer, deeper-colored gravy, as will adding a splash of soy sauce (not too much!) in place of the salt. Whisking your flour into the fat at the beginning, turning it into a smooth paste, will prevent lumps. If you need to add more later do the same, whisking it into a little gravy, or use cornstarch stirred into cold water (start with a teaspoon of each). Get rid of lumps before it even goes in, and you won’t need to worry about getting them out.

To make gravy, first remove as much fat as you can from the pan juices, and set it aside. Place the roasting pan or another saucepan over medium-high heat while the chicken is resting. Add 1-2 Tbsp. of the reserved turkey fat or olive or canola oil to the pan, whisk in 2-4 Tbsp. of flour and cook the mixture, whisking constantly and scraping up any flavorful browned bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan, until the it turns golden.

Whisk in the reserved juices plus enough chicken stock to make about 2 cups and cook, whisking constantly, until the gravy bubbles and thickens. Add a splash of wine or cider if you like. If you have some roasted garlic cloves that roasted with the chicken, smush them into the gravy as well. Season it with salt and pepper. Once it bubbles for a minute it will reach it’s full thickening potential from the flour – if it’s not thick enough continue to simmer it, or add another spoonful of flour, whisked first into a small cup of gravy and then added back in. If it’s too thick, add more stock.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Article Posted 5 years Ago
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