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Blood Orange Marmalade

Blood oranges are in season. I admit I buy them mostly for aesthetic reasons, and it seems a waste to toss away their crimson-tinged skins after eating their ruby insides. Blood oranges makes a lovely, mellow, maroon-ish marmalade. A small potful will make you some friends, especially if you’re invited to attend a tea party, and it’s perfect if you’re planning an Easter brunch. Since spring is the season for tea with biscuits and scones, I referred to Marisa of Food in Jars for her expertise in the area of all things preserved. She knows her stuff.

You could use a combination of blood oranges and regular orange ones – if you have some with thick, pulpy skins, grate off the zest, then peel away the white pith and discard it before chopping the fruit.

Blood Orange Marmalade

Adapted from Food in Jars!

8-10 blood oranges, scrubbed well
3 1/2 cups sugar
juice of a lemon
1 pkg liquid pectin

Put your jars through the dishwasher, set on hot. (This is what I do – you can sterilize them however you like.) Chop the oranges, peel and all, as thickly as finely as you like. I did some finely, others in bigger pieces so I had some chunky bits.

In a large pot, combine oranges, sugar, lemon juice and a cup of water. Bring the mixture to a hard boil. (A rolling boil you aren’t able to stir down.) Reduce the heat and simmer for about 20 minutes. Stir in the pecin and bring back to a hard boil. Cook for about 5 minutes, then ladle while hot into your hot jars (fresh from the dishwasher, right?) – wipe the rims, lid and seal. If you like, process them in a hot water bath; otherwise let them cool and store on the shelf (if they’ve sealed properly) or in the fridge. (This is what I do – feel fry to use your own method.) Makes 7-8 cups.

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