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Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Popsicles

cookie dough popsicles

Homemade popsicles are still the cool-down treat of choice this summer, and when I came across these frozen cookie-dough pops, I knew I had to give them a try. They don’t actually contain cookie dough, but the brown sugar- and vanilla-spiked milk base makes them taste like cookie dough with every lick! A great solution when you’re craving chocolate chip cookies, but it’s too hot to bake.

This stroke of brilliance came my way via a delicious new book – The Cookie Dough Lover’s Cookbook, by Lindsay Landis. Who doesn’t love cookie dough? Lindsay has come up with 50 ways to transform that delicious brown sugar-chocolate combo into tasty treats, without worrying about the raw egg that some are concerned about in traditional cookie dough. These creamy ice pops are a perfect example — chocolate chip cookies and milk, all rolled into one and put on a stick.

Wonky sticks? If your ice-pop mold does not include built-in sticks or a lid to hold them in place, you may find yourself with sticks pointing every which way but up. To prevent this, simply stretch a layer of plastic wrap over the top of the mold and secure it with a rubber band. Cut a small slit in the plastic, centered over each pop, and insert a stick through each opening. Alternatively, you can adjust sticks as necessary after about 45 minutes of freezing, when the pops aren’t yet frozen solid.

Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Ice Pops

Funny thing about these popsicles: there’s not actually any cookie dough in them. Yet each lick, each bite, has just enough brown sugar and vanilla to make you think that you’re eating cookie dough, or at least its essence. Is invisible cookie dough better than the real thing? I’ll let you be the judge. Reprinted with permission from the Cookie Dough Lovers’ Cookbook.

Makes: 4 pops
Active time: 5 minutes
Total time: 3 hours

Ingredients:
1 1/4 cups milk (skim, 2%, or whole, your choice)
1/3 cup light brown sugar, packed
Pinch salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 tablespoons mini semisweet chocolate chips

Directions
In a microwave-safe container or glass measuring cup, microwave milk 30 seconds or until warm to the touch. Add brown sugar and salt and stir until dissolved. Add vanilla.

Place 1/2 tablespoon chocolate chips in the bottom of each of four 1/3-cup ice-pop molds or small paper cups. Top each with milk mixture. Insert sticks and place molds in freezer. Freeze until solid, at least 3 hours.

To release pops, run molds under warm water 20 to 30 seconds; they should slide right out. (If using paper cups, simply peel cups away and discard.)

About the book: If you’ve ever braved salmonella to taste the heavenly delight of raw cookie dough, you’re not alone. But raw eggs’ reign of terror has come to an end in The Cookie Dough Lover’s Cookbook: Cookies, Cakes, Candies, and More! (Quirk Books) by Love and Olive Oil blogger Lindsay Landis. Inside, bakers and cookie dough lovers will find the basic recipe for delicious and eggless cookie dough recipes that can be used to create a wide assortment of treats. The 50 recipes are broken down into six categories, such as:

Candy: Crispy peanut butter cookie dough truffles and cookie dough swirl marshmallows
Cookies & Brownies: Cookie dough whoopie pies and chocolate chip cookie dough brownies
Cakes, Custards, & Pies: Cookie dough crème brûlée and cookie dough mosaic cheesecake
Frozen Treats: Ice cream and cookie dough layer cake and invisible cookie dough ice pops
Indulgent Breakfasts: Cookie dough-filled crepes and baked cookie dough doughnuts
Fun Snacks & Party Fare: Cookie dough s’mores and chocolate cookie dough cannoli

(ӬLindsay Landis is a graphic designer/small-business owner by day and a food blogger/cookie dough addict by night. She is the author of the popular food blog Love and Olive Oil and lives in Nashville with her husband, Taylor, and their three crazy cats.)

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