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Crispy Turkey & Potato Cakes


Where there’s leftover turkey, leftover mashed potatoes likely follow. Mashed potatoes is one of the very best things you can have too much of – a big reason I always make extra, while I’m at it. Because it’s not many times a year I have the gumption to make real, smooth, peeled-potato mash. Usually I mix extras with a tin of flaked salmon and make fish cakes, but this year I heard of a habit I plan to adopt for my very own; friends mix and shape the leftover potatoes, chopped turkey and stuffing into patties and freeze them to brown in a skillet later on when they need a mini turkey dinner dinner in a crispy patty.

I mean – look at this. Doesn’t it bring a tear to your eye? Crunchy outside, soft within; I’m dying to turn it into some sort of turkey dinner eggs Benedict. But then I may have to spend the rest of the year in my stretchy red fleece PJ pants with the snowflakes on them.

Measurements don’t matter – just so long as you have a bit of potato and stuffing to bind the turkey (and veg, if you like) together. Add an egg if you’re nervous (I didn’t) and some salt and pepper. If you shape them a day ahead and keep them covered in the fridge that will help, too, and make for an easy and fancy-ish brunch. If you want to dredge them in flour before putting them in your hot pan (a cast iron skillet is perfect, with some canola oil and some butter), go right ahead.

These are reason enough to roast a turkey when it’s not even Christmas or Thanksgiving – and why not? Roasting a turkey (or cooking it in the slow cooker) is one of the easiest things you can do – something we may start to do on random Sundays. Leftovers are so versatile, I think if it as upgrading our usual roast chicken. Besides, I’m thinking there are some great deals to be had on turkeys right about now, and the barbecue makes for fine extra freezer space (when it’s -16, like it is today).

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