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Delicious Rosemary Cookies with The Year in Food

rosemary cookie

Photo courtesy of Kimberley Hasselbrink, The Year in Food

As we’ve mentioned, we’re huge fans of The Year in Food. So it’s really is an honor to be able to present one of Kimberley’s recipes here on the Family Kitchen. These rosemary shortbread cookies are our kind of treat–sweet but salty, not too trying to make, but still subtle and sophisticated.

Savory sweets are a real favorite around here, and these light, buttery cookies with rosemary are the perfect way to celebrate spring’s arrival. The pictures look good enough to eat, but before you drool on your computer, go ahead and make some for yourself.

For more tasty recipes from The Year in Food, head over to Kimberley’s fantastic site here.

Rosemary Cookies

2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup cornmeal
1 cup sugar
2 tablespoons rosemary
2 teaspoons orange zest
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
1 large egg

Combine flour, cornmeal, sugar, rosemary, orange zest and salt in a mixing bowl. Separately, whisk together the butter and sugar until fluffy. Add the egg, and beat together. Add the dry ingredients to the wet and mix until combined.

Divide dough in half and shape into 5-inch disks. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least one hour. May be chilled overnight.

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.

On a floured surface, roll dough to thickness of 1/8 inch. Use 1 or 1.5 inch round cookie cutters to cut dough into rounds. Dip the cookie cutters in flour if dough sticks.

Grease an 11×17 baking sheet and arrange cookies. Bake for about 12-15 minutes, turning the sheet halfway. Cookies will be ready when the edges have browned. Keep an eye on them – they’ll go from perfect to burned pretty quickly!

Yield: roughly 5 dozen

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