Cooking with Kids – Recipes from Dora

Editors’ Note: We know how much your kids-and ours-love Dora and Diego, so here’s an exclusive sneak peek at the irrepressible pair’s new cookbook Let’s Cook. It’s all about cooking with kids, and includes fun recipes (like the three featured below) to get your kids involved. But let’s let Dora and Diego speak for themselves:

Just like on an adventure, safety is most important when cooking with young children, but there are other things to remember too. Patience is key. Young children accomplish tasks at different skill levels than adults-so the meatballs may be a little irregularly shaped. That’s fine-it’s all part of the adventure. Things tend to get messy too. There will be flour on the floor, peanut butter smeared on the counter, and you both may need a change of clothes before dinner-and that’s perfectly OK! When you sit down to eat the food you made together, the pride your child feels at having helped with such an important job will be apparent. Then you can both shout: “We did it! ¡Lo hicimos!”

Here are 3 kids recipes that are both fun to make and fun to eat.

  • Bird's Nests

    Bird’s Nest

    Hash browns, cheese and tomatoes not only make a tasty breakfast, but the combination of these ingredients on a plate also looks like, well, a bird’s nest. Who knew making breakfast could be this fun?

    Get the Recipe »

  • Estrellitas

    Estrellitas

    Whole wheat bread and peanut butter become magical when cut into star-shaped snacks with dried fruit on top. If your kids love stargazing, they’ll also enjoy making (and eating) these healthy bites.

    Get the Recipe »

  • Crystal Kingdom Jewel Cups

    Crystal Kingdom Jewel Cups

    Your kids have never seen a Jell-O recipe like this one. A few cookie cutters, a mix of gelatin flavors, plus some fruit and whipped cream combine to make a dessert that’ll be the jewel of your (kid’s) kitchen.

    Get the Recipe »

  • Recipe reprinted from the book Dora & Diego Let’s Cook. Copyright © 2010. Photographs Copyright © 2010 by Greg Scheidemann and Chris Hennessey. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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