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Edible Flower Guide: Ideas and Recipes

We all know we need to eat our fruits and veggies, but have you ever considered eating your flowers? A host of common flowers really are edible and can add pop and color to your summer dishes, not to mention unique flavor. Of course eating flowers can be daunting if you’re not familiar with the types and varieties that are edible. Luckily, Brooklyn Supper has put together a handy guide to some common edible flowers.

We also are happy to share our easy starter recipe for Johnny jump-up jam. It’s a cinch to make and has a beautiful violet hue. The flavor is mild and sweet, floral and bright. Mostly, it’s just fun to say you made it from flowers!

Note that you should use caution when eating flowers. Know your types, and use this guide to research varieties. Always eat flowers from a known, reputable source–flowers from florists are not suitable for eating.

Common Edible Flowers and Uses


  • Nasturtium 1 of 4
    Nasturtium
    Nasturtiums are most commonly used in salads or in stir fries. The whole plant is edible and has a peppery taste similar to watercress. Image: Armon
  • Chive 2 of 4
    Chive
    Chive flowers have a pungent oniony flavor similar to that of the chive plant. Great for use in salads, cooked dishes, or to flavor butter or olive oil. Image: Captain-tucker
  • Violet and Johnny Jump-Up 3 of 4
    Violet and Johnny Jump-Up
    Both members of the viola family, these flowers have a mild sweet flavor that is particularly suited to jam. They are also excellent salad garnishes. Image: Pigsonthewing
  • Pansy 4 of 4
    Pansy
    This flower has a mild, flowery taste and is great as a colorful garnish in salads, cold drinks, or even homemade ice pops.

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