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Eggs Baked in a Bread Bowl

We eat a lot of eggs on toast around here. Poached, usually, as we grew up with. Sometimes we crack eggs into halved bagels in a hot skillet, but I recently came across these eggs baked in bread bowls on the Noble Pig, and can’t believe I never thought of it. How genius are these? Hollowed-out buns with eggs cracked in, baked in the oven. A great way to serve a bunch of people at once, without worrying about poaching your eggs perfectly (even more difficult to do in large quantities).

This really shouldn’t require a recipe per se – it’s just eggs cracked into hollowed-out buns and baked on a cookie sheet – but there are plenty of things you could do with them. Add fresh or dried herbs, grated cheese, a drizzle of cream… use your imagination, or let kids or guests doll up their own before sliding them all into the oven together to bake just until set. If you like, toast the lids alongside, then slice them into “soldiers” for dipping.

Baked Eggs in Bread Bowls

Adapted from Noble Pig, who was inspired by All You

crusty dinner rolls, as many as you want
large eggs – one for each roll
chopped fresh basil, parsley, chives, tarragon – anything you like
cream
salt and pepper
grated Parmesan cheese or gruyère , or anything sharp (old cheddar, Gouda, Asiago…)

Preheat the oven to 350F. Slice the top off of each roll and remove the bread inside, leaving just the crusty shell (don’t make it too thin-leave some bread in there for insurance against leaking). Place them on a baking sheet and crack an egg into each roll. Top each egg with some herbs, salt and pepper and about a teaspoon of cream. Sprinkle with Parmesan or other cheese. Bake for about 20 minutes, until eggs are set and bread is toasted. If you like, brush the tops of the buns with a little butter or oil and add them to the sheet about halfway through, to toast them as well.

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