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Elizabeth's Cranberry-Orange Loaf

cranberry orange loaf, cranberry breadI think everyone should know how to make a cranberry-orange loaf. It’s simple, versatile, and great for holiday breakfast and snacking. This one is from Eric Akis’ cookbook, Everyone Can Cook for Celebrations, a great book to have on the shelf to pull into service for any holiday. He got this particular recipe from his friend Elizabeth. I like that it’s packed with cranberries and makes use of only 1/4 cup of butter. It also doubles well — so you can eat one and freeze the other for the same amount of work or have enough to feed a crowd.

Elizabeth’s Cranberry-Orange Loaf

from Everyone Can Cook for Celebrations by Eric Akis. The addition of golden raisins makes this loaf reminiscent of a fruitcake — you can always leave them out. (I also reduced the salt from 1 tsp. to 1/4 tsp.)

2 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup sugar
1 1/2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 cup butter, softened
1 large egg, lightly beaten
1 tsp. grated orange zest (I don’t measure — just zest the whole orange.)
3/4 cup orange juice
1 1/2 cups fresh or frozen cranberries
1 1/2 cups golden raisins (optional)

Preheat the oven to 350F and spray a 9″x5″ loaf pan with nonstick spray. In a large bowl, stir together the dry ingredients. Cut in the butter until the mixture is evenly crumbly. (Idea: you could do this in the food processor, and make dry mixes in advance to keep in the freezer; add the egg, juice and berries when you want to bake it!)

Add the egg, zest and juice and stir until almost combined; add the cranberries and raisins and stir just until the batter comes together. Spread into the pan and bake for about an hour, until the top is springy to the touch.

Photo credit: photo courtesy of Everyone Can Cook for Celebrations (Whitecap Books)

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