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Fat Tuesday Treat: German Pancake (Dutch Baby) from Barb of Vino Luci

By fujimama |

German Pancake Slice

Tomorrow is Fat Tuesday (aka, Mardi Gras and Shrove Tuesday) which is also known as Pancake Day in many other countries!  I hope you’ll join me in making pancakes.  If you don’t know what kind to make, make sure to check out my Pancake Week page where you’ll find all kinds of ideas!  Today I’m sharing another fantastic way to use up your eggs and dairy products before Lent begins on Wednesday.

Barb of Vino Luci

My sweet friend Barb, of Vino Luci, is sharing her recipe for German Pancake (aka Dutch Baby).  We both are part German, so I love that she chose to share this recipe as part of our Pancake Week celebrations! Barb and I “met” on Twitter almost two years ago when I was switching my blog over to WordPress from Blogger.  I remember tweeting about my frustration and Barb came to the rescue.  Barb has had a web development business (Kinetic Webs) since 1995 and just happened to be in the process of expanding her business to start doing web development for WordPress blogs.  We worked together to build my new site and quickly became close friends.  She is a kindred spirit and I love her spunk.  We recently had a little Pancake Q&A—

German Pancake, Dutch Baby

Rachael: Why do you love this recipe?

Barb: It’s unique, easy to make and probably best of all, it’s reminds me of both my Grandma Lizette and my daughters Emily and Lauren. One made it for me…the other two I made it for!

Rachael: Is there a story behind the recipe?

Barb: Yes; it’s thought to originally have been a German recipe but the ‘Dutch Baby’ connotation is most likely because the word Deutsch (German) was mangled and became Dutch; an American trademarked that name and it stuck. My Grandfather was German and I’m certain whatever I had as a young girl was the real deal!

Rachael: What are your favorite pancake toppings?

Barb: This pancake has some very particular toppings. Traditionally served with lemon and powdered sugar, I always provide options of either the traditional way, sauteed apples with cinnamons or toasted almonds. When it comes to regular pancakes I just like them the old fashioned way…butter and real maple syrup and if available, either fresh blueberries or raspberries on the top.

Rachael: When do you like to make it?

Barb: It is something I would typically serve at brunch for company or if my kids are coming over for breakfast.

Rachael: Any favorite tricks or tips to pancake making?

Barb: This particular pancake is easy as there is no leavening and it’s baked but I almost made a mistake today when I made this so make sure it’s in the middle of the oven and there is no rack above it; it puffs up a LOT!

When I make pancakes for the griddle, it’s always a challenge in Denver due to our high altitude. So, a hot griddle and a bit less leavening are required to set the dough before it rises too far and goes flat.

Rachael: What would you do for a stack of pancakes?

Barb: Well, that all depends doesn’t it? But for a stack of really good pancakes, I might just wash my face AND comb my hair. :)

Rachael: Maple Syrup: cold or hot?

Barb: Hot, hot, hot.

Rachael: Lighter or darker? Crispy edges or barely cooked?

Barb: Medium light…any movement toward darker and I get that bit of burned taste. Just barely cooked…I think a great pancake should be light as air. Now this pancake? Totally different, the edges do brown and get a bit crispy but in this case it’s the right thing.

Rachael: Stacked or not stacked?

Barb: If making regular pancakes…yes, they’re stacked. Not only melts the butter but they keep each warm. Do not, I repeat, do not stack a German Pancake. Unless of course Paul Bunyon is your breakfast guest.

Now that we’ve wet your appetite, go and check out Barb’s fabulous German Pancake (Dutch Baby) recipe, a perfect choice for Fat Tuesday!  If you’re on Twitter, Barb’s handle is @VinoLuci!

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