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How to Repair Thanksgiving Dinner: Tips to save your holiday meal

So you’re preparing a festive once-a-year dinner for many more people than you’re comfortable cooking for? And you’re cooking far more dishes than you’d usually attempt at once and you want them all to turn out perfectly and at exactly the same time? Oh, and you say that some of your guests are folks who make you feel nervous and edgy, like your mother-in-law, your cousin who does everything perfectly, or your aunt who always said you’d amount to no good?

Is this a recipe for disaster or for Thanksgiving dinner? It’s often both.

It’s no surprise that Thanksgiving includes its fair share of culinary catastrophes. And while those can provide family stories for years to come, we’re here to help prevent stories at your expense. Here are some tips and tricks to make your Thanksgiving dinner turn out to be one that’s talked about for all the right reasons.

  • The Small Stuff

    The Small Stuff

    Cranberry sauce and stuffing are just as essential to your Thanksgiving meal as the turkey. Mess up one of these key sides and no matter how good your turkey is, your culinary pride may dip when the sauce and stuffing aren’t quite right. So, here are some last-minute fixes and stress-free solutions to your cranberry sauce and stuffing issues. None of your guests will see you sweat!

    Get the fixes »

  • The Main Event: Turkey

    The Main Event: Turkey

    Thanksgiving is the one day all year when turkey is everyone’s favorite meat. It’s also the one time a year you probably cook an entire bird. (So much for practice makes perfect.) But fear not – whether you’ve forgotten to take out the giblets before putting the turkey in the oven or you’ve forgotten to just take it out of the freezer, there are ways to make it work.

    Get the fixes »

Reprinted with permission from How to Repair Food by Tanya Zeryck, John Bear, and Marina Bear, copyright © 1998, 2010. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.

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