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Around the World in 18 Dishes


  • Around the World in 18 Dishes 1 of 19
    around-the-world
    Kid-friendly international food for the family
  • Nutella Banana Dorayaki 2 of 19
    Nutella Banana Dorayaki
    Traditional Japanese dorayaki are made by sandwiching a sweet red bean paste between two pancakes. This recipe diverges slightly from that concept to be a bit more kid-friendly, using banana slices and Nutella between two orange mochi pancakes. (Who, young or old, wouldn’t want a Nutella pancake sandwich?!)
    Make Nutella banana dorayaki »
  • Chinese Marbled Tea Eggs 3 of 19
    Chinese Marbled Tea Eggs
    These tea eggs, originating from northern China, symbolize prosperity for the coming year. Your kids will love cracking the eggshells and admiring the marbled patterns underneath — and then they can have them for breakfast!
    Make Chinese marbled tea eggs »
  • Vietnamese Rice Paper Rolls 4 of 19
    Vietnamese Rice Paper Rolls
    These Vietnamese rolls are the perfect thing to bring to a party. They can be filled with whatever the kids like, they’re easy to transport, and they look like tiny treasures waiting to be snatched up
    by little hands.
    Make Vietnamese rice paper rolls »
  • Brazilian Cheese Balls 5 of 19
    Brazilian Cheese Balls
    Your kids can try a new food without straying too far from the norm with these puffy cheese balls, known as pao de queijo in Brazil. They cook up quickly and make for an easy appetizer or side dish. (Bonus: they’re gluten-free!)
    Make Brazilian cheese balls »
  • Croque Monsieur Croissant Sandwiches 6 of 19
    Croque Monsieur Croissant Sandwiches
    This recipe combines two ultra-French foods: the croissant and the Croque Monsieur, which is basically an open-faced grilled cheese (the kids know what that is!) with ham. Be sure to don your berets and hold your pinkies out while cutting into this fancy sandwich!
    Make croque monsieur croissant sandwiches »
  • Gyros 7 of 19
    Gyros
    Whether you pronounce this Greek dish “ji-roh” or “yeer-oh,” there’s one thing we can all agree on: everyone at the dinner table will love these tasty lamb sandwiches with cool, mild Tzatziki sauce.
    Make gyros »
  • Easy Udon Noodle Soup 8 of 19
    Easy Udon Noodle Soup
    Udon refers to the thick noodle used in Japanese cuisine, such as soups like this one. Made with chicken broth, it’s not a far cry from your kid’s beloved chicken noodle, so they shouldn’t be too nervous about trying it.
    Make easy udon noodle soup »
  • Sushi 9 of 19
    Sushi
    Making this Japanese staple isn’t as hard as it seems — and it’s the perfect no-heat meal to get your kids involved. Let them choose what goes into each roll (so they’ll be more likely to eat it), and then they can smash rice onto seaweed sheets and stuff veggies in, before rolling it all up.
    Make sushi »
  • Easy Chana Masala (Chickpea Curry) 10 of 19
    Easy Chana Masala (Chickpea Curry)
    A quick, easy dinner you won’t even have to turn on the oven for, Chana Masala is a popular meat-free dish in Pakistani and Indian cuisine — and may prove to be just as well-liked on your dinner table. Skip the jalapeno so it’s not too spicy for young palates.
    Make chana masala »
  • Basic Tomato Sauce 11 of 19
    Basic Tomato Sauce
    The humble tomato sauce is the little black dress of family meals and a staple of Italian cuisine, which prides itself on using simple but fresh ingredients. We’re sure your kids are already in love with spaghetti and meatballs, but you may want to try this back-to-basics sauce for a change.
    Make basic tomato sauce »
  • Boller I Karry (Danish Curried Meatballs) 12 of 19
    Boller I Karry (Danish Curried Meatballs)
    A favorite among kids in Denmark (and perhaps a soon-to-be favorite at your dinner table), this lightly-curried comfort food is just a little different from your average meatballs. Get the kiddos involved by having them sprinkle on all sorts of toppings!
    Make boller i karry »
  • Pumpkin Pierogies 13 of 19
    Pumpkin Pierogies
    Pierogies are an Eastern European dish similar to Italian raviolis, but stuffed with vegetables, potatoes, or cheese in lieu of sauce. This version is filled with a fall-ready flavor kids are probably already familiar with: pumpkin puree!
    Make pumpkin pierogies »
  • Sosatie 14 of 19
    Sosatie
    Sosatie is a South African version of barbecue, traditionally made with marinated chunks of pork and lamb. But just in case your kids are still a bit attached to Lamb Chop, our version uses pork and chicken instead.
    Make sosatie »
  • Black Bean Chicken Taquitos 15 of 19
    Black Bean Chicken Taquitos
    Mexican taquitos are small, rolled-up tortillas stuffed with meat, such as this chicken variety. The neat little packaging makes them easier to eat than tacos, and we’ve opted to go a little healthier than traditional fried versions by baking ours in the oven.
    Make black bean chicken taquitos »
  • Pad Thai 16 of 19
    Pad Thai
    This takeout favorite — and popular Thai street food — is made with noodles and bean sprouts. With its milder (but equally tasty) flavors, it's the ideal dish to introduce to your kids before moving on to spicier Thai curries and sauces.
    Make Pad Thai »
  • Swedish Meatballs 17 of 19
    Swedish Meatballs
    Thanks to IKEA and a large Scandinavian population in the Midwest, these rich, creamy meatballs have already become a staple in some American families’ dinner menus. Perhaps it’s time
    to add it to yours …
    Make Swedish meatballs »
  • Bread Pudding 18 of 19
    Bread Pudding
    We think pudding and envision powdered mixes and one-serving cups — but this version is a popular dessert in the UK, taking stale bread and turning it into a hearty, sweet treat.
    Tea time, anyone?
    Make bread pudding »
  • Maple Syrup Tarts 19 of 19
    Maple Syrup Tarts
    Our neighbors up north count toward global cuisine, too! Butter tarts are considered one of Canada’s quintessential desserts, and they’re not unlike the, er, American tarts your kids have probably eaten. Give this simple recipe a whirl for an international post-dinner treat (mini Canadian flag not included).
    Make maple syrup tarts »

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