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Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Butterbeer Ice Cream

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 hits theaters at midnight tonight, and with a Harry Potter fan in the house, it has been the subject of great excitement. Having Harry Potter on the brain got me thinking of butterbeer, and how delicious it would be translated into an ice cream float, or ice cream itself.

If your kids are Harry Potter fans (and even if they’re not), butterbeer ice cream is a great way to cool down on a hot day. If you like, make floats by serving a scoop of ice cream in a tall glass with a drizzle of butterscotch sauce, topped with soda water.

Butterbeer Ice Cream

Adapted from SmittenKitchen‘s butterscotch ice cream, which was adapted from Sunset Magazine. You could add pumpkin pie spice, or make a sort of salted butterbeer ice cream by adding a sprinkle of good-quality crunchy salt at the end.

1 cup packed brown sugar
2 Tbsp butter
2 tsp vanilla
1/4 tsp pumpkin pie spice (optional)
1 1/2 cups whipping cream
2 cups half & half cream
6 large egg yolks

Put the brown sugar and butter into a medium pan set over medium heat, and cook until the butter is melted, sugar is dissolved, and mixture is bubbly, 3 to 4 minutes. Whisk in 1/2 cup whipping cream until smooth and remove from heat. Whisk in the vanilla and pumpkin pie spice.

In a small saucepan, bring the remaining whipping cream and the half-and-half to a simmer.

In a medium bowl, whisk the egg yolks until smooth; whisk 1/2 cup of the warm cream mixture into the yolks, then pour the egg yolk mixture into the pan with the cream. Stir constantly over low heat just until mixture is slightly thickened, 2 to 4 minutes.

Pour the mixture through a fine sieve into a bowl and whisk in the butterscotch mixture. Refrigerate until completely cold, then freeze in an ice cream maker according to manufacturer’s instructions.

Photo credit: istockphoto.com/OlgaMiltsova

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