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Harry Potter's Acid Drops - Make Them Yourself!

Acid drops, short for acidulated drops, are a popular candy in England, with citric acid added to make the candy sour. Acid drops are very similar to lemon drops and look exactly the same, unless you add food coloring or pour the syrup into molds (oiled and heatproof) for different shapes. In Harry Potter The Prisoner of Azkaban, Ron reminisces about Acid Pops, remembering how the one Fred gave him when he was little burned a hole in his tongue. He wonders if he should try getting Fred back by buying him a Cockroach Cluster and telling him it’s peanuts. They’re actually very simple to make at home – the citric acid easy to find at health food stores (I use it to make fresh mozzarella).

We’ve posted this and other recipes from The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook here. It’s a simple mixture of sugar, water and corn syrup, with the citric acid stirred in at the end. Watch the mixture carefully as it cooks – it seems to take ages to reach 225°F, and then it will bolt up to 300°F, so don’t walk away from it, or it will burn! If you don’t have a candy thermometer, cook until the mixture turns golden.

Turn them into acid pops by sticking lollipop sticks into the drops while they’re still hot or pouring them into oiled heatproof lollipop molds. (Be careful not to use chocolate molds – they’ll melt when you pour in the hot candy.) The mixture should have cooled to the consistency of thick honey before you drop it onto your sheet – the less runnier it is, the thicker your candies will be.

We’re giving away our only copy of The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook to one lucky winner! To enter for your chance to win, just go to our Facebook page and tell us: What is your favorite Harry Potter book? You have until Sunday, October 24th 12AM EST. A winner will be chosen at random.

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