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Homemade Lollies: Candy Spoons

My 5 year old invented these one afternoon as we were making candy apples.

If you’ve ever made candy apples, you’ll know it gets tricky to dip and coat them once the syrup starts running low and cooling down. Ever the resourceful five year old, my son ran to the utensil drawer and brought back a spoon to scrape up the candy in the bottom of the pot. It looked lovely with its silver handle, and we dropped a few sprinkles on the surface while it was still hot and sticky.

Once cooled, the candy spoons were lovely, with their (environmentally friendly!) silver handles – the boys carried them around licking them all afternoon. When they were done, the spoons went into the dishwasher.

You could use any hard candy recipe to make these spoons – flavor the mixture with any flavored oil or extract you like, and tint it with food coloring only if you want to – once cooked, the candy is a beautiful golden color as is. If you’re not up for making candy (it’s easier than you might think) – try melted chocolate.

Candy Spoons

1 cup sugar
1/2 cup light corn syrup
1/4 cup water
a few drops food coloring, if you like
sprinkles

small teaspoons

Line a baking sheet with foil or parchment.

In a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan, combine the sugar, corn syrup, water and food coloring (if you’re using it) over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring to dissolve the sugar (this is important it will prevent crystallization, just stop stirring once the mixture comes to a boil) until it comes to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, swirling the pan occasionally but not stirring, until the mixture reaches 300F.

Remove from heat and dip spoons, holding them by the handles and coating the bowls as thick as you like. Place rounded side down on your prepared baking sheet and sprinkle with sprinkles while they are still warm. Cool completely. Makes lots.

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