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Homemade Oobleck

oobleck 6

Ever since I was a kid, we’ve made oobleck, a wacky combination of cornstarch and water that’s neither solid nor liquid. It’s still one of my favorite science experiments to do with kids. It’s named for the gooey substance in Bartholomew and the Oobleck, a classic Dr. Seuss book wherein a boy named Bartholomew is challenged to save his kingdom from the sticky green oobleck.

To make your own, all you need to do is combine cornstarch and water in a bowl – with a drop of food coloring to keep things interesting. Dr. Seuss’ oobleck is green, but you could make yours blue, yellow or pink – just swap your favorite color.

To make oobleck, stir together 1 1/2 cups cornstarch, 1 cup water and a drop or two of food coloring.

It’s the best kitchen science experiment to do with kids of all ages – and costs less than a dollar!


  • Cornstarch and Water 1 of 5
    Cornstarch and Water
    What could be easier?
  • Green goo 2 of 5
    Green goo
    But any color will do!
  • Have fun with it! 3 of 5
    Have fun with it!
    According to Scientific American oobleck is one of those substances that's both liquid and solid; "applying pressure to the mixture increases its viscosity… A quick tap on the surface of oobleck will make it feel hard, because it forces the cornstarch particles together." It's fun to play around with in the kitchen it's completely unlike any other substance you'll ever see.
  • Texture is key 4 of 5
    Texture is key
    It's the right consistency when it's pourable, yet it crumbles into chunks, and then melts, when you apply pressure to it.
  • Its the best kitchen science experiment to do with kids of all ages — and costs less than a dollar! 5 of 5
    Its the best kitchen science experiment to do with kids of all ages — and costs less than a dollar!
    It looks like a liquid, but crumbles into chunks like a solid, quickly reverting to its liquid state once you're no longer squeezing it.

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