Categories
Loading
Welcome to Babble,
Settings
Sign Out

Get the Babble Newsletter!

Already have an account? .

Hurricanes for Mardi Gras: Virgin and Otherwise


The hurricane drink was originally named after the lamp-shaped glasses they came in when served at Pat O’Brien’s bar in New Orleans in the 1940s. Made from light and dark rum, passion fruit juice and lime juice, these sweet drinks caught on and became a Mardi Gras mainstay in the French Quarter.

Mardi Gras season is in full swing. Fat Tuesday on March 8th is approaching quickly, and this is the time to party. My husband and I used to head down to Bockfest for the festivities over the weekend, but we’ve since taken to holing up at home. Still, though, Fat Tuesday will be celebrated here. Perhaps with a pancake or two, and, of course, a tall hurricane for good measure.

If you’re short on passion fruit juice, no worries. I have a few alternatives for you, as well as a virgin hurricane for those looking to celebrate without the booze.

Traditional Hurricane
2 ounces light rum
2 ounces dark rum
2 ounces passion fruit juice
1 ounce orange juice
half a lime, juiced
1 tablespoon grenadine

Shake all ingredients together with ice. Strain into lamp-shade-style glasses. Garnish with a maraschino cherry and lemon and lime wedges.

Virgin Hurricane
2 ounces orange juice
2 ounces pineapple juice
1 ounce passion fruit juice
half a lime, juiced
1 tablespoon grenadine

Shake together with ice. Strain into lamp-shade-style glasses. Garnish with a maraschino cherry and lemon and lime wedges.

(Note: I put grapefruit slices into my mocktails as well.)

Passion Fruit Substitutions:
No passion fruit juice? Substitute with red grapefruit juice.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as: , ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest