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No Unnecessary Antibiotics in My Food, Please


Antibiotic resistance is not a joke. As antibiotics are misused and overused, people self-medicating, using prescriptions when there isn’t an actual bacteria threat present, the power of those antibiotics decreases. The bacteria themselves have developed a resistance to the antibiotic, and instead of having the drug stop them in their tracks, they go on multiplying. The infection continues to spread and grow.

This is how diseases like MRSA and resistance E. coli come about, ready to kill. What does this have to do with our food? In 2010 the FDA showed that 29 million pounds of antibiotics per year were going into conventional food animals in the United States each year.

Last year, The New York Times ran a story on testing the amount of antibiotics in milk where the FDA wanted to and the industry didn’t want them to. The FDA had repeatedly found antibiotics in milk over the legal limits. (Mmmm, sucking down some drugs with my morning cereal.) Then Care2 followed with a response that shows how antibiotic use and rBGH use are linked. The rGBH caused engorgement and mastitis in the cows, which meant a need to treat them with antibiotics. So now your milk has growth hormones, antibiotics and IGF-1 that is stimulated by rBGH.

I’ll take my organic milk and dairy products like yogurt and cheese, thanks. It’s worth every penny for the health of my family.

A big thanks to YoBaby for sponsoring this campaign. Click here to see more of the discussion.

**Read more from Shaina on Food for My Family! Follow Shaina on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest for updates!

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Top Photo Credit: Brooke McLay

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